Magnetic-pole definitions

Either of the two ends of a magnet at which the field of the magnet is most intense. Each pole is designated by the approximate geographic direction in which it points, either north or south. Like magnetic poles repel; opposite magnetic poles attract.
noun
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Either pole of a magnet, where the magnetic lines of force seem to be concentrated.
noun
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A geomagnetic pole.
noun
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Either point on the earth's surface toward which the needle of a magnetic compass points: the north and south magnetic poles do not precisely coincide with the geographical poles.
noun
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Either of two regions of a magnet, designated north and south, where the magnetic field is strongest. Electromagnetic interactions cause the north poles of magnets to be attracted to the south poles of other magnets, and conversely. The north pole of a magnet is the pole out of which magnetic lines of force point, while the south pole is the pole into which they point. The Earth's geomagnetic “north” and “south” poles are, in fact, magnetically the opposite of what their names suggest; this is why the north end of a compass needle is attracted to the geomagnetic “north” pole.
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Either of two regions of the Earth's surface at which magnetic lines of force are perpendicular to the Earth's surface. The Earth's magnetic poles are close to, but not identical with, both its geographic poles (the North and South Poles) and its geomagnetic poles .
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Either of the two points, near the ends of a magnet, at which the magnetic lines of force converge.
noun
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Either of the two locations on a planet's surface at which the planet's magnetic field lines are vertical.
noun
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