Friction meaning

frĭkshən
The rubbing of one object or surface against another.
noun
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(physics) A force that resists the relative motion or tendency to such motion of two bodies or substances in contact.
noun
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The definition of friction is conflict or unease created when two people of opposing views or ideals come together or the resistance that occurs when surfaces rub together.

An example of friction is when Republicans and Democrats get together and discuss politics.

An example of friction is when rope rubs against your hand and you get rope burn.

noun
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A rubbing, esp. of one object against another.
noun
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Ill will or conflict because of differences of opinion, temperament, etc.
noun
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Conflict, as between persons having dissimilar ideas or interests; clash.
noun
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A force on objects or substances in contact with each other that resists motion of the objects or substances relative to each other. &diamf3; Static friction arises between two objects that are not in motion with respect to each other, as for example between a cement block and a wooden floor. It increases to counterbalance forces that would move the objects, up to a certain maximum level of force, at which point the objects will begin moving. It is measured as the maximum force the bodies will sustain before motion occurs. &diamf3; Kinetic friction arises between bodies that are in motion with respect to each other, as for example the force that works against sliding a cement block along a wooden floor. Between two hard surfaces, the kinetic friction is usually somewhat lower than the static friction, meaning that more force is required to set the objects in motion than to keep them in motion.
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The rubbing of one object or surface against another.
noun
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(mech.) The resistance to motion of two moving objects or surfaces that touch.
noun
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Conflict, as between persons having dissimilar ideas or interests; clash.
noun
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(physics): A force that resists the relative motion or tendency to such motion of two bodies in contact.
noun
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Origin of friction

  • Latin frictiō frictiōn- from frictus past participle of fricāre to rub

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle French friction and directly from Latin frictionem, nom. frictio (“a rubbing, rubbing down”)

    From Wiktionary