Concord meaning

kŏn'kôrd', kŏng'-
The definition of concord means harmony or agreement.

An example of concord is a peaceful relationship between two countries.

noun
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A treaty establishing peaceful relations.
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Agreement between words in person, number, gender, or case.
noun
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Harmony or agreement of interests or feelings; accord.
noun
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A harmonious combination of simultaneously sounded tones.
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A town of eastern Massachusetts on the Concord River west-northwest of Boston. An early battle of the American Revolution was fought here on April 19, 1775. In the 19th century the town was noted as an intellectual and literary center.
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The capital of New Hampshire, in the south-central part of the state on the Merrimack River. It became the capital in 1808.
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Agreement; harmony.
noun
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noun
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A combination of simultaneous and harmonious tones; consonance.
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A large, dark-blue, cultivated variety of fox grape, used esp. for making juice and jelly.
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A wine made from this grape.
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City in W Calif., near Oakland.
proper name
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Capital of N.H., on the Merrimack River.
proper name
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Town in E Mass., near Boston: with Lexington, site of the first battles of the Revolutionary War (April 19, 1775)
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A state of agreement; harmony; union.
noun
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(grammar) Agreement of words with one another, in gender, number, person, or case.
noun
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(probably influenced by chord, music) An agreeable combination of tones simultaneously heard; a consonant chord; consonance; harmony.
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A variety of American grape, with large dark blue (almost black) grapes in compact clusters.
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(intransitive, obsolete) To agree; to act together - Edward Hyde Clarendon.
verb
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The state capital of New Hampshire.
pronoun
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A city in Northern California.
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A city in Massachusetts and a site of the Battle of Lexington and Concord.
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Origin of concord

  • prob. alluding to the amity hoped for among the inhabitants and their neighbors
    From Webster's New World College Dictionary, 5th Edition
  • Middle English concorde from Old French from Latin concordia from concors concord- agreeing com- com- cor heart kerd- in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From French concorde, Latin concordia, from concors (“of the same mind, agreeing”); con- + cor, cordis (“heart”). See heart, and compare accord
    From Wiktionary
  • From French concorder, from Latin concordo
    From Wiktionary