Unison definition

yo͝onĭ-sən, -zən
The action of speaking the same words simultaneously.

The children greeted their teacher in unison.

noun
20
4
Performance of an action at the same time.

Crew members rowing in unison; pigeons wheeling in unison.

noun
12
4
An interval consisting of two identical musical pitches; prime.
noun
7
3
Unison is when multiple things are done at the same time, or when two or more musical instruments combine at the same pitch.

When you and someone else both say the exact same thing at the exact same time, this is an example of a situation where you are talking in unison.

noun
2
1
Complete agreement; concord; harmony.
noun
4
4
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Agreement; concord.

Their expectations were in unison.

noun
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0
Identity of pitch; the interval of a perfect prime.
noun
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0
The combination of parts at the same pitch or in octaves.
noun
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0
The state of being together, in harmony, at the same time, as one, synchronized.

Everyone moved in unison, but the sudden change in weight distribution capsized the boat.

noun
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0
(music) The simultaneous playing of an identical note more than once.

The unison has a pitch ratio of 1:1.

noun
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0
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(in music): P1
abbreviation
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(UK, labor union) A public sector trade union in the UK.
pronoun
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in unison
  • sounding the same note at the same time
  • sounding together in octaves
  • with all the voices or instruments performing the same part
  • uttering the same words, or producing the same sound, at the same time
idiom
2
0

Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
unison
Plural:
unisons

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of unison

  • Middle English from Old French from Medieval Latin ūnisonus in unison from Late Latin monotonous Latin ūni- uni- Latin sonus sound swen- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English unisoun, from Middle French unisson, from Medieval Latin unisonus (“having the same sound"), from Latin uni- + sonus (“sound").

    From Wiktionary