Protocol meaning

prōtə-kôl, -kōl, -kŏl
Protocol is defined as the rules and customs of a group or a standard procedure.

An example of protocol is the method by which a learning center must document their students' progress.

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A standard procedure for regulating data transmission between computers.
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To draw up a protocol.
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The plan for a course of medical treatment or for a scientific experiment.
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A set of rules governing the communication and the transfer of data between machines, as in a computer system.
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A preliminary draft or record of a transaction.
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The plan for a course of medical treatment or for a scientific experiment.
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A set of standardized procedures for transmitting or storing data, especially those used in regulating data transmission between computers or peripherals.
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The format and procedure that governs the transmitting and receiving of data. The term comes from the Greek "protokollon," which was the cover page to a manuscript that provided a description of the contents. See communications protocol, protocol stack and OSI model.
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From the Greek protokollon, for a leaf of paper glued to a manuscript volume and describing its contents. The rules and conventions for exchanging information between computers or across computer networks. Protocols comprise conventions that, at a basic level, commonly include the dimensions of line setup, transmission mode, code set, and non-data exchanges of information such as error control. Protocols have two major functions: handshaking and line discipline.
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A set of rules governing how communications between two programs have to take place to be considered valid. It describes various ways of achieving and operating compatibility.
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(now chiefly historical) The minutes, or official record, of a negotiation or transaction; especially a document drawn up officially which forms the legal basis for subsequent agreements based on it. [from 15th c.]
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(international law, now rare) An official record of a diplomatic meeting or negotiation; later specifically, a draft document setting out agreements to be signed into force by a subsequent formal treaty. [from 17th c.]
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(international law) An amendment to an official treaty. [from 19th c.]
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The first leaf of a roll of papyrus, or the official mark typically found on such a page. [from 19th c.]
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The official formulas which appeared at the beginning or end of certain official documents such as charters, papal bulls etc. [from 19th c.]
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(sciences) The original notes of observations made during an experiment; also, the precise method for carrying out or reproducing a given experiment. [from 19th c.]
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The official rules and guidelines for heads of state and other dignitaries, governing accepted behaviour in relations with other diplomatic representatives or over affairs of state. [from 19th c.]
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(by extension) An accepted code of conduct; acceptable behaviour in a given situation or group. [from 20th c.]
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(computing) A set of formal rules describing how to transmit or exchange data, especially across a network. [from 20th c.]
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(medicine) The set of instructions allowing a licensed medical professional to start, modify, or stop a medical or patient care order. [from 20th c.]
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(obsolete) To make a protocol of.
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(obsolete, intransitive) To make or write protocols, or first drafts; to issue protocols.

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The first copy of a treaty or other such document before its ratification.
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To form or issue protocols.
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An original draft or record of a document, negotiation, etc.
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In science and medicine, a formal set of rules and procedures to be followed during a particular research experiment, course of treatment, etc.
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To issue in a protocol.
verb
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The plan for a course of medical treatment or for a scientific experiment.
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Origin of protocol

  • French protocole from Old French prothocolle draft of a document from Medieval Latin prōtocollum from Late Greek prōtokollon table of contents, first sheet Greek prōto- proto- Greek kollēma sheets of a papyrus glued together (from kollān to glue together) (from kolla glue)

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle French protocolle, protocole (“document, record"), and its source, Late Latin protocollum (“the first sheet of a volume (on which contents and errata were written)"), from Byzantine Greek πρωτόκολλον (“first sheet glued onto a manuscript"), from πρῶτος (prōtos, “first") + κόλλα (kolla, “glue").

    From Wiktionary