Jade meaning

jād
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Any of various hard greenish gems used in jewelry and artistic carvings, including jadeite and nephrite.
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Jade green.
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A woman regarded as promiscuous.
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An outgoing, often flirtatious girl.
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A green color of medium hue.
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Made of jade.
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Green like jade.
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To make or become tired, weary, or worn-out.
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A hard gemstone that is pale green or white and consists either of the mineral jadeite (a pyroxene) or the mineral nephrite (an amphibole). It usually forms within metamorphic rocks.
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​(uncountable) A semiprecious stone either nephrite or jadeite, generally green or white in color, often used for carving figurines.
  • 2012 March 1, Lee A. Groat, “Gemstones”, American Scientist, volume 100, number 2, page 128.
    Although there are dozens of different types of gems, among the best known and most important are diamond, ruby and sapphire, emerald and other gem forms of the mineral beryl, chrysoberyl, tanzanite, tsavorite, topaz and jade.
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A grayish shade of green, typical of jade stones.

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Of a grayish shade of green, typical of jade stones.
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A horse too old to be put to work.
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A woman, especially in contempt.
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A female given name.
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Either of two distinct minerals, nephrite and jadeite, that are generally pale green or white and are used mainly as gemstones or in carving.
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A carving made of jade.
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A broken-down or useless horse; a nag.
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A horse, esp. a worn-out, worthless one.
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Origin of jade

  • French (le) jade (the) jade alteration of (l')ejade from Spanish (piedra de) ijada flank (stone) (from the belief that it cured renal colic) from Vulgar Latin īliāta from Latin īlia pl. of īlium flank

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English cart-horse, nag perhaps akin to Swedish dialectal jälda mare possibly of Finno-Ugric origin and akin to Erzya (Finno-Ugric language of Russia) el’d’e Moksha (Finno-Ugric language of Russia) jäl’d’ä mare

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From French le jade, error for earlier l'ejade (“jade”), from Spanish piedra de ijada (“flank stone”), via Vulgar Latin *iliata from Latin ilia (“flank”) (Jade was thought to cure pains in the side.).

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English, perhaps from Old Norse jalda (“mare”), which is from Finno-Ugric, related to Mordvin al'd'a..

    From Wiktionary

  • From jade, taken into general use in the 1970s.

    From Wiktionary