Wend meaning

wĕnd
To proceed on or along; go.

Wend one's way home.

verb
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To go one's way; proceed.
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To proceed or go on (one's way)
verb
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Any of a group of Slavic peoples formerly inhabiting much of what is now eastern Germany and western Poland, especially the present-day Sorbs.
noun
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Any of various other non-Germanic peoples living in central Europe during late antiquity and the Middle Ages.
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To go; journey; travel.
verb
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noun
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To direct (one's way or course); pursue one's way; proceed upon some course or way.

We wended our weary way westward.

verb
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(obsolete, UK, law) A large extent of ground; a perambulation; a circuit.

noun
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A member of a Slavic people from the borders of Germany and Poland; a Sorb; a Kashub.
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Origin of wend

  • German Wende from Middle High German Winde, Wende from Old High German Winid wen-1 in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Middle English wenden from Old English wendan
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Middle English wenden, from Old English wendan (“to turn, direct, wend one's way, go, return, change, alter, vary, restore, happen, convert, translate"), from Proto-Germanic *wandijanÄ… (“to turn"), causative of Proto-Germanic *windanÄ… (“to wind"), from Proto-Indo-European *wendÊ°- (“to turn, wind, braid"). Cognate with Dutch wenden (“to turn"), German wenden (“to turn, reverse"), Danish vende (“to turn"), Swedish vända (“to turn, turn over, veer, direct"), Icelandic venda (“to wend, turn, change"), Gothic 𐍅𐌰𐌽𐌳𐌾𐌰𐌽 (wandjan, “to cause to turn"). Related to wind.
    From Wiktionary
  • From German Wende, from Old High German Winida, from Celtic *vindo (“white"), same source as Old English Winedas (“Wends").
    From Wiktionary