Slav meaning

släv
A member of one of the Slavic-speaking peoples of eastern Europe.
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Slavic.
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A member of any of a group of Slavic-speaking peoples of E, SE, and central Europe, generally divided into Eastern Slavs, Southern Slavs, and Western Slavs.
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Slavic.
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A member of any of the peoples from Eastern Europe who speak the Slavic languages.
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(UK, birdwatching) The Slavonian grebe.
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Alternative form of Slavey.
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Origin of slav

  • Middle English Sclave from Medieval Latin Sclāvus from Late Greek Sklabos alteration of Old Slavic Slověninŭ

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Commonly thought to derive from Proto-Slavic *slovo (“word"), thus meaning "those who speak meaningfully" and contrasting with *nÄ›mÑŒcÑŒ (“foreigner", literally “dumb/mute person"). However, that word is an s-stem and thus the inflectional stem of that word is *sloves-, so it cannot be the direct origin as it would lead to an expected form *slovesÄ›ni (compare Russian словесность (slovesnost')). Thus the most likely origin is the verb *sluti (“to be known"). Both words ultimately derive from Proto-Indo-European *ḱlew- (“fame").

    From Wiktionary

  • Middle English sclave, from Medieval Latin sclavus or Sclavus, from Byzantine Greek Σκλάβος (Sklábos), from earlier Σκλαβῆνος (SklabÄ“nos), plural Σκλαβῆνοι (SklabÄ“noi), from Proto-Slavic *slovÄ›nji, *slovÄ›ne (“those who speak meaningfully"), singular *slovÄ›ninÑŠ. Compare Old Church Slavonic словѣни (slovÄ›ni), словѣнє (slovÄ›ne, “Thessalonian Slavs"), Old East Slavic словѣне (slovÄ›ne, “Slavs near Novgorod").

    From Wiktionary