Engross meaning

ĕn-grōs
To engross is defined as to take all of someone's attention.

When a book is fascinating and takes all your attention, this is an example of when you engross yourself in the book.

verb
5
1
To occupy exclusively; absorb.

A novel that engrosses every reader.

verb
4
1
To acquire most or all of (a commodity); monopolize (a market).
verb
3
0
To prepare a document, such as a deed or a legislative bill, for execution or passage.
verb
3
0
To take the entire attention of; occupy wholly; absorb.

Engrossed in a book.

verb
2
0
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​(now law) To write (a document) in large, aesthetic, and legible lettering; to make a finalized copy of.
  • Nathaniel Hawthorne.
    Some period long past, when clerks engrossed their stiff and formal chirography on more substantial materials.
  • De Quincey.
    Laws that may be engrossed on a finger nail.
verb
1
0
To monopolize; to concentrate (something) in the single possession of someone, especially unfairly.
verb
1
0
To completely engage the attention of.

She seems to be completely engrossed in that book.

verb
1
0
To express formally or in legal form.
verb
0
0
To make gross, thick, or large; to thicken; to increase in bulk or quantity.
verb
0
0
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Origin of engross

  • Middle English engrossen to collect in large quantity, monopolize from Old French engrossier from en gros in large quantity en in (from Latin in in–2) gros large gross Sense 3, from Middle English engrossen to make a finished copy of a legal document from Anglo-Norman engrosser from Medieval Latin ingrossāre Latin in- in en–1 grossa a copy in a large hand (from Late Latin grossus thick)

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English engrossen, from Anglo-Norman engrosser (“to gather in large quantities, draft something in final form”); partly from the phrase en gros (“in bulk, in quantity, at wholesale”), from en- + gros; and partly from Medieval Latin ingrossō (“thicken, write something large and in bold lettering”, v.), from in- + grossus (“great, big, thick”), from Old High German grōz (“big, thick, coarse”), from Proto-Germanic *grautaz (“large, great, thick, coarse grained, unrefined”), from Proto-Indo-European *ghrewə- (“to fell, put down, fall in”). More at in-, gross.

    From Wiktionary