Abrupt meaning

ə-brŭpt
The definition of abrupt is when something suddenly happens or changes suddenly, with no advance warning.

An example of abrupt is a driver quickly making a left turn without putting his turn signal on first.

adjective
11
0
Unexpectedly sudden.

An abrupt change in the weather.

adjective
4
0
Terminating suddenly rather than gradually; truncate.

An abrupt leaf.

adjective
2
0
Coming, happening, or ending suddenly; sudden; unexpected.
adjective
2
0
Without notice to prepare the mind for the event; sudden; hasty; unceremonious. [First attested in the late 16th century.]

The party came to an abrupt end when the parents of our host arrived.

adjective
2
0
Advertisement
Abrupt is when someone is short or curt in their manner or actions.

An example of abrupt is a teacher who always cuts her students off in conversation without ever stopping to listen.

adjective
2
1
Abrupt means the edge of something appears to break off suddenly or steeply.

An example of abrupt is a high cliff on the edge of a mountain.

adjective
1
0
Surprisingly curt; brusque.

An abrupt answer made in anger.

adjective
1
0
Steeply inclined.
adjective
1
0
Curt or gruff in behavior or speech; brusque.
adjective
1
0
Advertisement
Very steep.
adjective
1
0
Jumping from topic to topic without proper transitions; jerky and disconnected.
adjective
1
0
Having sudden variations in composition, form, etc.
adjective
1
0
Curt in manner; brusque; rude; uncivil; impolite. [First attested in the late 16th century.]
adjective
1
0
Having sudden transitions from one subject or state to another; unconnected; disjointed. [First attested in the late 16th century.]

The abrupt style, which hath many breaches.

adjective
1
0
Advertisement
Extremely steep or craggy as if broken up; precipitous. [First attested in the early 17th century.]
adjective
1
0
(botany) Suddenly terminating, as if cut off; truncate. [First attested in the early 19th century.]

adjective
1
0
(archaic) To tear off or asunder. [First attested in the mid 17th century.]
verb
1
0
To interrupt suddenly. [First attested in the mid 17th century.]
verb
1
0
(poetic) Something which is abrupt; an abyss. [First attested in the mid 17th century.]
noun
1
0
Advertisement
Touching on one subject after another with sudden transitions.

Abrupt prose.

adjective
0
1

Origin of abrupt

  • Latin abruptus past participle of abrumpere to break off ab- away ab–1 rumpere to break reup- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • First attested in 1583. From Latin abruptus (“broken off”), perfect passive participle of abrumpō (“break off”), formed from ab (“from, away from”) + rumpō (“to break”).

    From Wiktionary