Staccato meaning

stə-kätō
Staccato is music or speech where each sound is short and disconnected from the other sounds.

An example of staccato is a song with short, quick notes.

noun
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The definition of staccato is where each sound is short and distinct from the other sounds.

An example of sound that would be described as staccato is the sound of a machine gun.

adjective
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Made up of abrupt, distinct elements or sounds.

A staccato outburst of gunfire.

adjective
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(musical direction) With distinct breaks between successive tones.
adjective
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So as to be staccato; in a staccato manner.
adverb
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Something, as a speech pattern, that is staccato.
noun
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(music) An articulation marking directing that a note or passage of notes are to be played in an abruptly disconnected manner, with each note sounding for a very short duration, and a short break lasting until the sounding of the next note; as opposed to legato. Staccato is indicated by a dot directly above or below the notehead.
noun
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Made up of abruptly disconnected parts or sounds.

He spoke with a deep staccato voice.

adjective
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(music) Cut short crisply; detached.

Staccato octaves.

adjective
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(music) A passage having this mark.
noun
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(music) Played in this style.

Now, play the same passage very staccato.

adverb
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(music) Describing a passage having this mark.
adjective
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Marked by or composed of abrupt, disconnected parts or sounds.

Staccato applause.

adjective
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A staccato manner or sound.
noun
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Origin of staccato

  • Italian past participle of staccare to detach short for distaccare from obsolete French destacher from Old French destachier detach

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Italian staccato "detached, disconnected", past participle of staccare "to detach, separate", aphetic variant of distaccare "to separate, detach" from Middle French destacher "to detach" from Old French destachier "to detach" from des- +"Ž attachier (“to attach"), alteration of estachier "to fasten with or to a stake, lay claim to" from estach(e) "a stake", from Low Frankish *stakka "stake", from Proto-Germanic *stakkaz, *stakkÄ“n (“stick, stake"), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)teg- (“stick, stake"). Akin to Old High German stecko "post" (German Stecken "stick"), Old Saxon stekko "stake", Old Norse stakkr "hay stack, heap", Old English staca "stake". More at stake.

    From Wiktionary