Begin meaning

bĭ-gĭn
The definition of begin means to start or come into being.

An example of begin is when you start working at 8:00 A.M.

An example of begin is the invasion that started World War II in 1939.

An example of begin is when legislation is passed that starts to deal with a problem.

verb
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To do or accomplish something in the least degree. Used in the negative with an infinitive.

Those measures do not even begin to address the problem.

verb
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To come into being.

When life began.

verb
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To say as the first in a series of remarks.

“I didn't like the movie,” he began.

verb
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To perform or undergo the first part of an action; start.

I began to e-mail you but got interrupted. The rain began around noon.

verb
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To cause to come into being; originate.

An invention that began a new era.

verb
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(intransitive) To start, to initiate or take the first step into something.

I began playing the piano at the age of five. Now that everyone is here, we should begin the presentation. The program begins at 9 o'clock on the dot. I rushed to get to class on time, but the lesson had already begun.

verb
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To take the first step in doing; start.

Began work.

verb
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To come first in (a series, for instance).

The numeral 1 begins the sequence.

verb
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To start doing, acting, going, etc.; get under way.
verb
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To come into being; arise.
verb
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To have a first part or element.

The Bible begins with Genesis.

verb
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To be or do in the slightest degree.

They don't begin to compare.

verb
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To cause to start; set about; commence.
verb
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To cause to come into being; originate.
verb
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To be the first part or element of.
verb
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1913-92; prime minister of Israel (1977-83), born in Poland.
proper name
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(intransitive) To commence existence.
verb
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(nonstandard) Beginning; start.
noun
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to begin with
  • As the first point or consideration.
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of begin

  • Middle English biginnen from Old English beginnan

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English beginnen, from Old English beginnan (“to begin”), from Proto-Germanic *biginnaną (“to begin”) (compare West Frisian begjinne, Low German begünnen, Dutch and German beginnen), from a root *ginnaną also found in Old English onginnan, Old Saxon andginnan and Dutch ontginnen, possibly from Proto-Indo-European *ghendhe/o (“to take”) (compare Welsh genni (“to delve, submerge onself”), Latin prehendō, Albanian (“to catch”), Ancient Greek [script?] (chandánein, “to hold, contain”)).

    From Wiktionary