Cork meaning

kôrk
The lightweight elastic outer bark of the cork oak, used especially for bottle closures, insulation, floats, and crafts.
noun
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To blacken with burnt cork.
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A city of southern Ireland near the head of Cork Harbor, an inlet of the Atlantic Ocean. Cork was occupied by the Danes in the ninth century and by Oliver Cromwell in 1649.
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The light, thick, elastic outer bark of an oak tree, the cork oak (Quercus suber) of the beech family, that grows in the Mediterranean area: used for floats, stoppers, linoleum, insulation, etc.
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The dead, waterproof outer bark of the stems of woody plants.
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Made of cork.
adjective
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To stop or seal with a cork.
verb
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To hold back; check.
verb
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To blacken with burnt cork.
verb
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To modify (a bat) by drilling a hole in the large end and filling it with cork or rubber: this practice is believed to give the batter an unfair advantage and is illegal.
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County on the S coast of Ireland, in Munster province: 2,880 sq mi (7,459 sq km)
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Its county seat, a seaport.
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The outermost layer of tissue in woody plants that is resistant to the passage of water vapor and gases and that becomes the bark. Cork is secondary tissue, formed on the outside of the tissue layer known as cork cambium . The cell walls of cork cells contain suberin. Once they mature, cork cells die.
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The lightweight, elastic outer bark of the cork oak, which grows near the Mediterranean Sea. Cork is used for bottle stoppers, insulation, and other products.
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(uncountable) The bark of the cork oak, which is very light and porous and used for making bottle stoppers, flotation devices, and insulation material.
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A bottle stopper made from this or any other material.

Snobs feel it's hard to call it wine with a straight face, when the cork is made of plastic.

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An angling float, also traditionally made of oak cork.
noun
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The cork oak.
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(botany) The tissue that grows from the cork cambium.
noun
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To seal or stop up, especially with a cork stopper.
verb
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To blacken (as) with a burnt cork.
verb
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To leave the cork in a bottle after attempting to uncork it.
verb
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(slang) To be quiet.

He was so loud I told him to cork it.

verb
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To fill with cork, as the center of a baseball bat.

He corked his bat, which was discovered when it broke, causing a controversy.

verb
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(Australia) To injure through a blow; to induce a haematoma.

The vicious tackle corked his leg.

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(snowboarding) A snowboarding aerialist maneuver involving a rotation where the rider goes heels over head, with the board overhead.
noun
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(snowboarding) To perform such a maneuver.
verb
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(snowboarding) Having the property of a head over heels rotation.
adjective
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Principal city of County Cork.
pronoun
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County in the Republic of Ireland. (County Cork)
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A small float used on a fishing line or net to buoy up the line or net or to indicate when a fish bites.
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A nonliving, water-resistant protective tissue that is formed on the outside of the cork cambium in the woody stems and roots of many seed plants.
noun
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To stop or seal with or as if with a cork.
verb
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To restrain or check; hold back.

Tried to cork my anger.

verb
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blow one's cork
  • To lose one's temper; become enraged.
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

blow one's cork

Origin of cork

  • Middle English corke cork, cork-soled shoe probably ultimately from Arabic dialectal qurq perhaps (via Berber) from Latin cortex, cortic- bark cortex
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Middle English cork (“oak bark", "cork”), from Middle Dutch curc (“cork (material or object)”) or Middle Low German korck (“cork (material or object)”) or Early Modern German Kork (“cork (material or object)”), 1) from Spanish corcho (“cork (material or object)”) (also corcha or corche), (via Mozarabic) from Latin cortex (“bark”), or 2) from (Old) Spanish alcorque (“cork sole”), from Andalusian Arabic القورق (al-qūrq), from Latin quercus (“oak”) or Latin cortex (“bark”) or from Aramaic
    From Wiktionary
  • From the traversal path resembling that of a corkscrew.
    From Wiktionary