Coriolis-force meaning

A pseudo force used mathematically to describe motion, as of aircraft or cloud formations, relative to a noninertial, uniformly rotating frame of reference such as the earth.
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An apparent deflective force acting on a moving object, as an airplane, that is being observed from a rotating system, as the surface of the earth: it is proportional to the speed of the object and is in a direction perpendicular to its direction of motion.
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A velocity-dependent pseudo force used mathematically to describe the motion of bodies in rotating reference frames such as the Earth's surface. Bodies moving on the plane of rotation appear to experience a force, leftward if the rotation of the reference frame is clockwise, rightward if counterclockwise. Such motion gives rise to the Coriolis effect.
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(physics, meteorology) A fictitious force apparently exerted on any moving body (including a parcel of air) due to the rotation of the earth, observed as a deflection of the body to the right of its direction of travel (i.e., clockwise) in the Northern Hemisphere, or to the left (anticlockwise) in the Southern Hemisphere; any equivalent apparent force that deflects objects in a rotating reference frame.
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Origin of coriolis-force

  • After Gaspard G. de Coriolis (1792–1843), French mathematician
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From French Coriolis (“a surname”) + English force, after French scientist Gaspard G. de Coriolis.
    From Wiktionary