Coriolis-effect meaning

kôr'ē-ō'lĭs
The Coriolis effect is defined as how a moving object seems to veer toward the right in the Northern hemisphere and left in the Southern hemisphere.

An example of the Coriolis effect is hurricane winds turning left in the Northern hemisphere.

noun
5
2
The observed effect of the Coriolis force, especially the deflection of an object moving above the earth, rightward in the Northern Hemisphere and leftward in the Southern Hemisphere.
noun
4
1
The apparent deflection of a moving mass of water, air, etc. to the right in the Northern Hemisphere and to the left in the Southern Hemisphere.
noun
4
1
The observed effect of the Coriolis force, especially the deflection of objects or substances (such as air) moving along the surface of the Earth, rightward in the Northern Hemisphere and leftward in the Southern Hemisphere. The Coriolis effect is named after the French engineer Gustave Gaspard Coriolis (1792–1843).
1
3
Advertisement