Geld meaning

gĕld
A tax paid to the crown by English landholders under Anglo-Saxon and Norman kings.
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A tax paid to the crown by English landholders in Anglo-Saxon and Norman times.
noun
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To castrate a horse or other similar animal.
verb
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Money; notably:
noun
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To castrate a male (usually an animal).
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To castrate (a horse, for example).
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To deprive of strength or vigor; weaken.
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To castrate (esp. a horse)
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To deprive of anything essential; weaken.
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Origin of geld

  • Middle English geld Medieval Latin geldum both from Old English geld, gield payment

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English gelden from Old Norse gelda

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English geld and Medieval Latin geldum, both from Old English geld, ġield (“payment, tribute”), from Proto-Germanic *geldą (“reward, gift, money”), from Proto-Indo-European *gʰeldʰ- (“to pay”). Cognate with North Frisian jild (“money”), Saterland Frisian Jäild (“money”), Dutch geld (“money”), German Geld (“money”), Old Norse gjald (“payment”), Gothic (gild). Also related to English yield. Geld is also written gelt or gild, and as such found in wergild, Danegeld, etc. Probably reinforced by gelt (which see).

    From Wiktionary

  • From Old Norse gelda (“geld, castrate”), from geldr (“yielding no milk, dry”), cognate with Old High German galt. Cognate with Gothic (gilþa, “sickle”). Compare the archaic German Gelze, “castrated swine” and gelzen (“castrate”), Danish galt (“boar”) (from Old Norse gǫltr (“boar, hog”), cognate with English gilt) and gilde (“to geld”). "gelding" derives from Old Norse geldingr.

    From Wiktionary