Torque meaning

tôrk
A tightly braided necklace or collar, often made of metal, worn by various early European peoples.
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Torque is a twisting force, generally that causes something to rotate around an axis or other point.

The force that causes a wheel to rotate around an axle is an example of torque.

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The tendency of a force applied to an object to make it rotate about an axis. For a force applied at a single point, the magnitude of the torque is equal to the magnitude of the force multiplied by the distance from its point of application to an axis of rotation. Torque is also a vector quantity, equal to the vector product of the vector pointing from the axis to the point of application of force and the vector of force; torque thus points upward from a counterclockwise rotation.
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The measure of a force's tendency to produce torsion or rotation about an axis, equal to the product of the force vector and the radius vector from the axis of rotation to the point of application of the force; the moment of a force.
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A turning or twisting force.
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To impart torque to.
verb
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A collar, a necklace, or an armband made of a strip of twisted metal, worn by the ancient Celts and Germans.
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A twisted metal collar or necklace worn by ancient Teutons, Gauls, Britons, etc.
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A measure of the tendency of a force to cause rotation, equal to the force multiplied by the perpendicular distance between the line of action of the force and the center of rotation.
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The force that acts to produce rotation, as in the drive shaft of an automotive vehicle.
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To give or impart torque to; cause to turn or twist.
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(physics, mechanics) A rotational or twisting effect of a force; a moment of force, defined for measurement purposes as an equivalent straight line force multiplied by the distance from the axis of rotation (SI unit newton-metre or Nm; imperial unit foot-pound or ft.lbf).
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To twist or turn something.
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Origin of torque

  • French from Old French from Latin torquēs from torquēre to twist terkw- in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Latin torquēre to twist terkw- in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Latin torqueō.
    From Wiktionary
  • From Latin torquis
    From Wiktionary