Connote meaning

kə-nōt'
To suggest or imply in addition to literal meaning.

The word “lion” denotes a kind of wild cat but connotes courage and dignity.

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To connote is defined as to suggest or convey an additional meaning or a special importance to the usual meaning of a specific word.

An example of to connote is to imply many qualities about a relationship by calling someone your partner.

verb
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To signify beyond its literal or principal meaning.

Racism often connotes an underlying fear or ignorance.

verb
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To possess an inseparable related condition; to imply as a logical consequence.

Poverty connotes hunger.

verb
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(intransitive) To express without overt reference; to imply.
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(intransitive) To require as a logical predicate to consequence.
verb
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To have as a related or attendant condition.

For a political leader, hesitation is apt to connote weakness.

verb
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To suggest or convey (associations, overtones, etc.) in addition to the explicit, or denoted, meaning.

The word “mother” means “female parent,” but it generally connotes love, care, tenderness, etc.

verb
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To imply or involve as a result, accompaniment, etc.
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Origin of connote

  • Medieval Latin connotāre to mark along with Latin com- com- Latin notāre to mark (from nota mark gnō- in Indo-European roots)
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Medieval Latin connotō (“signify beyond literal meaning”), from com- (“together”), + notō (“mark”).
    From Wiktionary