Sewer definition

so͝oər
Frequency:
A pipe or drain, usually underground, used to carry off water and waste matter.
noun
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1
A medieval servant of high rank in charge of serving meals and seating guests.
noun
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1
One who sews.
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The definition of a sewer is someone who sews.

An example of a sewer is a seamstress who makes repairs at a dry cleaners.

noun
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1
Sewer is defined as a set of pipes and drains to remove waste water and other waste materials.

An example of a sewer is the drainage area into which home toilets feed.

noun
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An artificial, usually underground conduit for carrying off sewage or rainwater.
noun
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A pipe or system of pipes used to remove human waste and to provide drainage.
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(now historical) A servant attending at a meal, responsible for seating arrangements, serving dishes etc.
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A small tortricid moth whose larva sews together the edges of a leaf by means of silk.

The apple-leaf sewer, Phoxopteris nubeculana.

noun
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To clean or maintain sewers.
verb
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A person or thing that sews.
noun
2
3
A medieval servant who supervised the serving of meals.
noun
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2
An artificial, usually underground conduit for carrying off sewage or rainwater.
noun
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3
One that sews.

A sewer of fine clothing.

noun
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Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
sewer
Plural:
sewers

Origin of sewer

  • Middle English from Anglo-Norman sewere from Vulgar Latin exaquāria Latin ex- ex- Latin aquāria feminine of aquārius pertaining to water (from aqua water akw-ā- in Indo-European roots)

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English from Anglo-Norman asseour from asseer to seat guests from Latin assidēre to sit down ad- ad- sedēre to sit sed- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Anglo-Norman sewere (“water-course"), from Old French sewiere (“overflow channel for a fishpond"), from Vulgar Latin *exaquāria (“drain for carrying water off"), from Latin ex (“out of, from") with aquāria.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Anglo-Norman asseour, from Old French asseoir (“find a seat for"), from Latin assidÄ“re, present active participle of assideō (“attend to"), from ad (“to, towards, at") + sedeō (“sit").

    From Wiktionary

  • sew +"Ž -er

    From Wiktionary