Lapse meaning

lăps
The act or an instance of lapsing, as:
  • A usually minor or temporary failure; a slip.
    A lapse of memory; a lapse in judgment.
  • A deterioration or decline.
    A lapse into barbarism.
  • A moral fall.
    A lapse from grace.
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A slip of the tongue, pen, or memory; small error or failing.
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A break in continuity; a pause.

A lapse in the conversation.

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A period of time; an interval.

A lapse of several years between the two revolutions.

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(law) The termination of a right or privilege as a result of expiration, disuse, or impossibility.
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A falling away from one's belief or faith.
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To slip or fall; esp., to slip into a specified state.

To lapse into a coma.

verb
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To stop practicing one's religion; lose or abandon one's faith.

A lapsed Catholic.

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To pass away; elapse.
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To come to an end; stop or expire.

My subscription lapsed.

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To become forfeit or void because of failure to pay the premium at the stipulated time.
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(law) To pass to another proprietor by reason of negligence or death.
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To make forfeit or void by not meeting standards.
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The termination or expiration of a right because it has not been exercised or because of the occurrence or nonoccurrence of some contingency.
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An interval of time between events.
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A termination of a right etc, through disuse or neglect.
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(weather) A marked decrease in air temperature with increasing altitude because the ground is warmer than the surrounding air. This condition usually occurs when skies are clear and between 1100 and 1600 hours, local time. Strong convection currents exist during lapse conditions. For chemical operations, the state is defined as unstable. This condition is normally considered the most unfavorable for the release of chemical agents. See lapse rate.
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(law) A common-law rule that if the person to whom property is willed were to die before the testator, then the gift would be ineffective.
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(theology) A fall or apostasy.
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(intransitive) To fall away gradually; to subside.
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(intransitive) To fall into error or heresy.
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To slip into a bad habit that one is trying to avoid.
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(intransitive) To become void.
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To fall or pass from one proprietor to another, or from the original destination, by the omission, negligence, or failure of somebody, such as a patron or legatee.
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To go by; elapse.

Years had lapsed since we last met.

verb
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A gliding or passing away, as of time or of anything continuously flowing.
noun
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To slip or deviate from a higher standard or fall into (former) erroneous ways; backslide.
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The definition of a lapse is a temporary failure in judgment or behavior or something that has declined in quality.

An example of lapse is when a person has a loss of memory.

An example of lapse is when a person temporarily stops paying attention or shows bad judgment.

An example of lapse is when a neighborhood that was once nice becomes full of crime.

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To lapse is defined as to become inactive, invalid, to end, or to stop doing something.

An example of lapse is to slip into unconsciousness.

An example of lapse is when your driver's license has expired.

An example of lapse is to stop going to church as required by your religion.

An example of lapse is when your homeowner's insurance becomes inactive because you failed to pay the bill.

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(law) To cease to be available as a result of expiration, disuse, or impossibility. Used of a right or privilege.
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To allow to lapse.
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Origin of lapse

  • Middle English lapsen to deviate from the normal from laps lapse of time, sin (from Old French lapse of time) (from Latin lāpsus) (from) (past participle of lābī to lapse) and from Latin lāpsāre frequentative of lābī

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle French laps, from Latin lapsus, from labi (“to slip").

    From Wiktionary