Gyp meaning

jĭp
A male servant at a college, esp. at Cambridge.
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Pain or discomfort.

My back's giving me gyp.

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To deprive (another) of something by fraud; cheat or swindle.
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A fraud or swindle.
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One who defrauds; a swindler.
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An act of cheating; swindle; fraud.
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A swindler.
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(informal) To swindle; cheat.
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(pejorative, sometimes offensive) A cheat or swindle; a rip-off.

Why do we have to buy this new edition of the textbook when there’s almost no difference between it and the previous one? What a gyp!

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(pejorative, sometimes offensive) To cheat or swindle someone of something inappropriately.

The cab driver gypped me out of ten bucks by taking the longer route.

You better watch out; they'll try to gyp you if you don't know what you're doing.

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(Cambridge and Durham, England) A college servant.
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(Cambridge and Durham, England) The room in which such college servants work.
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(Cambridge and Durham, England) A small kitchen for use by college students.
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Origin of gyp

  • Probably short for Gypsy (from prejudiced popular perceptions of the Romani people as thieves and petty swindlers)

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Probably from the term gypsy (“Roma”), due to a stereotype of the Roma as swindlers. Compare jew (“defraud”), from Jew, and welsh (“swindle by defaulting on a debt”), from Welsh.

    From Wiktionary

  • Perhaps the same as Etymology 1.

    From Wiktionary

  • Perhaps from gee up.

    From Wiktionary

  • Shortening.

    From Wiktionary