Welsh meaning

wĕlch
The definition of Welsh is something related to Wales, a principality of Great Britain that is located west of central England.

If a food is characteristic of Wales, this is an example of a food that would be described as Welsh.

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To welsh is defined as to go back on your word or fail to honor a promise.

When you promise to pay your son's college tuition if he gets into Harvard and then he gets in and you tell him you don't have the money after all, this is an example of a time when you welsh on your promise.

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To swindle a person by not paying a debt or wager.

Welsh on a bet.

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To fail to fulfill an obligation.
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Of or relating to Wales or its people, language, or culture.
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The people of Wales.
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The Celtic language of Wales.
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To avoid fulfilling one's debt or obligation.
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The Celtic language spoken in Wales.
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Of Wales or its people, language, or culture.
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(pejorative) To swindle someone by not paying a debt, especially a gambling debt.
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(now historical) (Native) British; pertaining to the Celtic peoples who inhabited much of Britain before the Roman occupation. [from 5th c.]
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Of or pertaining to Wales. [from 11th c.]
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Of or pertaining to the Celtic language of Wales. [from 16th c.]
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Designating plants or animals from or associated with Wales. (See Derived terms.) [from 17th c.]
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The Welsh language. [from 10th c.]
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(collectively) The people of Wales. [from 11th c.]
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A surname for someone who was a Welshman or a Celt.
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A breed of pig, kept mainly for bacon.
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Origin of welsh

Old English wÄ«lisc, wylisc, from Proto-Germanic *walhiskaz (“Celt; later Roman"), from *walhaz (“Celt") (compare Old English wealh), from the name of the Gaulish tribe, the Volcae (recorded only in Latin contexts). Historically the tribe's name has been linked to an animal, likely Gaulish *wolco- (“wolf"), as Caesar described the Celts having fought with huge dogs, in turn from Proto-Indo-European *wĺ̥kÊ·os.