Ester meaning

ĕstər
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An organic compound formed when an acid and an alcohol combine and release water. Esters formed from carboxylic acids are the most common, and have the general formula RCOOR&STRESS;, where R and R&STRESS; are organic radicals. Esters formed from simple hydrocarbon groups are colorless, volatile liquids with pleasant aromas and create the fragrances and flavors of many flowers and fruits. They are also used as food flavorings. Larger esters, formed from long-chain carboxylic acids, commonly occur as animal and vegetable fats, oils, and waxes. Esters have a wide range of uses in industry.
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An organic compound, comparable to an inorganic salt: generally, HR (inorganic acid) + R1OH (alcohol) = RR1 (ester) + H2O (water) or RCOOH (organic acid) + R1OH = RCOOR1 (ester) + H2O.
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(organic chemistry) A compound most often formed by the condensation of an alcohol and an acid, with elimination of water. It contains the functional group carbon-oxygen double bond joined via carbon to another oxygen atom.
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Any of a class of compounds derived from an oxyacid, usually resulting from the reaction of an oxyacid and an alcohol with the elimination of water.
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Origin of ester

  • German short for Essigäther Essig vinegar (from Middle High German ezzich) (from Old High German ezzīh) (from Latin acētum ak- in Indo-European roots) Äther ether (from Latin aethēr ether)

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Contraction or abstraction of German Essigäther (“ethyl acetate”), from Essig (“vinegar”) (from Latin acetum) and Äther (“ether”). See ether for more.

    From Wiktionary