X Definition

ĕks
x
noun
The twenty-fourth letter of the English alphabet: from a western form of the Greek alphabet.
Webster's New World
Any of the speech sounds that this letter represents, as, in English, the (ks) of lax, (gz) of exact, (k) of anxious, (g) of luxurious, or (z) of xylophone.
Webster's New World
A type or impression for x or X.
Webster's New World
The 24th in a series.
American Heritage
The twenty-fourth in a sequence or group.
Webster's New World
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verb
To indicate (one's choice or answer) by or as by marking with an X.
Webster's New World
To mark or sign with an X.
American Heritage
To delete or cancel (written or printed matter) with or as with one or more X's.
Webster's New World
abbreviation
Christ (Greek Χρɩστος, Khristos )
American Heritage
Christian.
American Heritage
Ex.
American Heritage
Extra.
Webster's New World
Ex dividend.
American Heritage
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adjective
Of x or X.
Webster's New World
Twenty-fourth in a sequence or group.
Webster's New World
Shaped like X.
Webster's New World
Synonyms:
symbol
By (in indicating dimensions)
3 ft x 4 ft.
Webster's New World
The power of magnification (in optical instruments)
Webster's New World
Times.
Webster's New World
Christ.
Webster's New World
Crossed with.
Webster's New World
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letter

The twenty-fourth letter of the English alphabet, called ex and written in the Latin script.

Wiktionary
conjuntion

(fandom slang) Used between the names of two characters to denote a ship, particularly in anime, manga, and video games.

Wiktionary
suffix
Forms plurals of ‘u’-terminal nouns (and, very rarely, some others), chiefly of French origin.
Wiktionary

(slang) Used to replace a -ks- sound, as in hax (hacks), punx (punks), pix (pics).

Wiktionary
prefix
Prefix used for CCITT-ratified (UN) international telecom standards on e-mail.
Wiktionary
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pronoun

(computing) Any of a family of instruction set architectures based on the Intel 8086 microprocessor.

Wiktionary
other

An ITU-T Recommendation (1988) for a public key infrastructure (PKI). X.509 establishes a hierarchical structure of certificate authorities (CAs) that issue digital certificates, which are electronic credentials that authenticate the identity of users on the Internet and intranets. See also authentication, CA, digital certificate, Internet, intranet, and PKI.

Webster's New World Telecom

An international standard (1988) developed jointly by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and the ITU-T to support the e-mail name and address lookup requirements of X.400. X.500 provides for global directory services that theoretically enable network managers to store information about all users, machines, and applications in a distributed fashion. X.500 is a very robust global directory standard that requires significant computational resources to implement and, therefore, is criticized for being over-engineered. See also e-mail, ISO, ITU-T, LDAP, X.400, and X Series.

Webster's New World Telecom

The symbol for reactance. See reactance.

Webster's New World Telecom

The ITU-T Recommendation for access to an X.25 packet network in synchronous dial-up mode through a public switched telephone network (PSTN), an integrated services digital network (ISDN), or a circuit-switched public data network (PDN). See also dial-up access, PDN, PSTN, synchronous, and X.25.

Webster's New World Telecom

In mathematics, the symbol for an unknown quantity, person, factor, or thing. X is the first in a set of two or three unknowns comprising x, y, and z. In telecommunications, for example, xDSL refers to any of a group of Digital Subscriber Line services. See also x-axis, xDSL, y, and z.

Webster's New World Telecom
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idiom
X's and O's
  • the basic elements of a specified field of work, knowledge, etc.; often, specif., the plays and strategies used in a particular sport
Webster's New World
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Idioms, Phrasal Verbs Related to X

Origin of X

  • X is prototypically pronounced [ks] in English; it therefore serves as a convenient shorthand for the digraphs (cs, ks, etc.) or trigraphs (cks etc.) that would otherwise represent that consonant cluster.

    From Wiktionary

  • The x functions as a wildcard; many similar processors also had names ending in 86.

    From Wiktionary

  • From the French plural suffix -x.

    From Wiktionary

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