Efface meaning

ĭ-fās
To remove or make indistinct.
verb
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To rub or wipe out; erase.

The serial number had been effaced from the stolen product.

verb
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To efface is defined as to make yourself inconspicuous or hidden from attention, or to erase something or consciously forget something.

When you block a memory out of your mind, effectively erasing it, this is an example of efface.

Where you try hard to blend in and not be noticed, this is an example of efface.

verb
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To conduct (oneself) inconspicuously.
verb
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(medicine) To cause to become shorter, softer, and thinner during labor.

The cervix was effaced as the contractions continued.

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(medicine) To become shorter, softer, and thinner during labor. Used of the cervix.
verb
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A position in ballet in which the dancer stands at an angle to the audience so that part of the body is hidden from view.
noun
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To rub out, as from a surface; erase; wipe out; obliterate.

Time effaced the memory.

verb
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To make (oneself) inconspicuous; withdraw (oneself) from notice.
verb
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To become shorter, softer, and thinner during labor: said of the cervix.
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To become shorter, softer, and thinner during labor. Used of the cervix.
verb
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To erase (as anything impressed or inscribed upon a surface); to render illegible or indiscernible.

Do not efface what I've written on the chalkboard.

verb
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To cause to disappear as if by rubbing out or striking out.

Some people like to efface their own memories with alcohol.

verb
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(reflexive) To make oneself inobtrusive as if due to modesty or diffidence.

Many people seem shy, but they really just efface for meekness.

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(medicine) Of the cervix during pregnancy, to thin and stretch in preparation for labor.

Some females efface 75% by the 39th week of pregnancy.

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Origin of efface

  • Middle English effacen from French effacer from Old French esfacier es- out (from Latin ex- ex-) face face face

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • French from past participle of effacer to efface efface

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle French effacer (“erase”), from Old French esfacier (“remove the face”).

    From Wiktionary