Alphabet meaning

ălfə-bĕt, -bĭt
The letters of a language, arranged in the order fixed by custom.
noun
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The definition of an alphabet is a system of letters of a language written or spoken in their proper order.

A, B, C and D are examples of letters of the alphabet.

noun
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A system of characters, signs, or symbols used to indicate letters or speech sounds.
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A system of characters or symbols representing sounds or things.
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(India) An individual letter of an alphabet; an alphabetic character.
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A set of basic parts or elements.
noun
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The first elements or principles, as of a branch of knowledge.
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The set of letters used when writing in a language.

The Greek alphabet has only twenty-four letters.

In the first year of school, pupils are taught to recite the alphabet.

noun
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A writing system in which letters represent phonemes. (Contrast e.g. logography, a writing system in which each character represents a word, and syllabary, in which each character represents a syllable.)
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The letters of a language, arranged in a traditional order.
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The simplest rudiments; elements.
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To designate by the letters of the alphabet; to arrange alphabetically.
verb
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(computer science) A typically finite set of distinguishable symbols.

Let be a regular language over the alphabet .

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Origin of alphabet

  • Middle English alphabete from Latin alphabētum from Greek alphabētos alpha alpha alpha bēta beta beta

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Late Latin alphabētum, from Ancient Greek ἀλφάβητος (alphabētos), from the first two letters of the Greek alphabet, ἄλφα (alpha) (Α,α) and βῆτα (bēta) (Β,β), from Phoenician aleph and beth (“house”), so called because they were pictograms of those objects.

    From Wiktionary