Rudiment meaning

ro͝odə-mənt
Frequency:
A first slight beginning or appearance, or undeveloped form or stage, of something.
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Rudiment is the most basic or elemental form, or an undeveloped organ or limb.

When you have only just begin to learn a new language and know only the simplest words, this is an example of learning the rudiments of the language.

The very first model of an early computer that has some basic elements of computers today is an example of the rudiment of modern computers.

An undeveloped arm on a fetus is an example of a rudiment.

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An imperfectly or incompletely developed organ or part.
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A first principle, element, or fundamental, as of a subject to be learned.

The rudiments of physics.

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An incompletely developed organ or part; specif., a vestigial organ or part with no functional activity; vestige.
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An imperfectly or incompletely developed organ or part.
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A fundamental principle or skill, especially in a field of learning (often in the plural).

We learn the rudiments of thermodynamics next week.

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Something in an undeveloped form (often in the plural).

I have the rudiments of an escape plan.

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(biology) A body part that no longer has a function.
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(music) In percussion, one of a selection of basic drum patterns learned as an exercise.
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Origin of rudiment

  • Latin rudīmentum from rudis rough, unformed

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Old French, from Latin rudimentum (“a first attempt, a beginning"), plural rudimenta (“the elements"), from rudis (“rude"); see rude.

    From Wiktionary