Institute definitions

ĭn'stĭ-to͝ot', -tyo͝ot'
Something instituted.
  • An established principle, law, custom, or usage.
  • A summary or digest of established principles, esp. in law.
  • An organization for the promotion of art, science, education, etc.
  • A school specializing in art, music, etc.
  • A college or university specializing in technical subjects.
  • An institution for advanced study, research, and instruction in a restricted field.
  • A short teaching program established for a group concerned with some special field of work.
  • .
noun
37
0
To set up; establish; found; introduce.
verb
34
0
To start; initiate.

To institute a search.

verb
31
0
An organization founded to promote a cause.

A cancer research institute.

noun
30
0
To install in office, esp. as a minister in a church or parish.
verb
28
1
A usually short, intensive workshop or seminar on a specific subject.
noun
27
0
To establish or invest (someone) in an office or position.
verb
24
0
The definition of an institute is an organization or school.

An example of an institute is an art college.

noun
15
0
To institute is defined as to start, establish or set up.

An example of to institute is beginning a new nutrition meal plan at an elementary school.

verb
12
0
An institution of learning; a college, especially for technical subjects.
noun
5
0
(obsolete) Established; organized; founded.
adjective
5
0
An organization founded to promote a cause.

I work in a medical research institute.

noun
2
0
The building housing such an institution.
noun
2
0
To establish, organize, or introduce.

Institute wage and price controls.

verb
0
0
To initiate; begin.

Institute a search for the missing hikers.

verb
0
0
An educational institution, especially one for the instruction of technical subjects.
noun
0
0
The building or buildings housing such an institution.
noun
0
0
A principle or rudiment of a particular subject.
noun
0
0
A digest of or commentary on such principles or rudiments, especially a legal abstract.
noun
0
0
To begin or initiate (something); to found.

He instituted the new policy of having children walk through a metal detector to enter school.

verb
0
0
Dr. H. More.

If children were early instituted, knowledge would insensibly insinuate itself.

verb
0
0
  • We institute your Grace / To be our regent in these parts of France.
verb
0
0
(ecclesiastical, law) To invest with the spiritual charge of a benefice, or the care of souls.

verb
0
0

Origin of institute

Middle English instituten from Latin īnstituere īnstitūt- to establish in- in in–2 statuere to set up stā- in Indo-European roots