Foil meaning

foil
One that stands in contrast to and emphasizes the distinctive characteristics of another.
noun
6
0
To foil is defined as to keep something from happening.

An example of foil is when your mom catches you sneaking out to go to a party.

verb
5
0
To prevent from being successful; thwart.

The alarm system foiled the thieves' robbery attempt.

verb
3
0
Foil is defined as a thin piece of metal, or a sword used in fencing.

An example of foil is aluminum foil, a thin metal sheet used to cover food before you put it in the freezer.

An example of foil is a long, thin sword used in sword fighting.

noun
2
0
To obscure or confuse (a trail or scent) so as to evade pursuers.
verb
2
0
Advertisement
(rare) To serve as a contrast to.
verb
2
0
(figuratively) In literature, theatre/theater, etc, a character who helps emphasize the traits of the main character.
noun
2
0
(figuratively) Anything that acts by contrast to emphasise the characteristics of something.
noun
2
0
A repulse; a setback.
noun
1
0
The trail or scent of an animal.
noun
1
0
Advertisement
Metal that has been formed into a thin, flexible sheet.

Aluminum foil.

noun
1
0
A thin layer of polished metal placed under a displayed gem to lend it brilliance.
noun
0
0
The reflective metal coating on the back of a glass mirror.
noun
0
0
(architecture) A curvilinear, often lobelike figure or space formed between the cusps of intersecting arcs, found especially in Gothic tracery and Moorish ornament.
noun
0
0
To cover or back with foil.
verb
0
0
Advertisement
To wrap (strands of hair) in pieces of foil in order to isolate them after bleach or color has been applied.
verb
0
0
To set off by contrast.
verb
0
0
A fencing sword having a usually circular guard and a thin, flexible four-sided blade with a button on the tip to prevent injury.
noun
0
0
The art or sport of fencing with such a sword.

A contest at foils.

noun
0
0
To keep from being successful; thwart; frustrate.
verb
0
0
Advertisement
(hunting) To make (a scent, trail, etc.) confused, as by recrossing, in order to balk the pursuers.
verb
0
0
(archaic) The scent or trail of an animal.
noun
0
0
(archaic) A thwarting.
noun
0
0
A leaflike, rounded space or design between cusps or in windows, etc., as in Gothic architecture.
noun
0
0
A very thin sheet or leaf of metal; specif., such a sheet, as of aluminum, used for wrapping food, etc.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
The metal coating on the back of a mirror.
noun
0
0
A thin leaf of polished metal placed under an inferior or artificial gem to give it brilliance.
noun
0
0
A person or thing that sets off or enhances another by contrast.
noun
0
0
To cover or back with foil.
verb
0
0
To decorate (windows, etc.) with foils.
verb
0
0
Advertisement
A long, thin fencing sword with a button on the point to prevent injury.
noun
0
0
The art or sport of fencing with foils.
noun
0
0
A very thin sheet of metal.
noun
0
0
(uncountable) Thin aluminium/aluminum (or, formerly, tin) used for wrapping food.
noun
0
0
A thin layer of metal put between a jewel and its setting to make it seem more brilliant.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
(fencing) A very thin sword with a blunted (foiled) tip.
noun
0
0
A thin, transparent plastic material on which marks are made and projected for the purposes of presentation. See transparency.
noun
0
0
(heraldry) A stylized flower or leaf.
noun
0
0
Shortened form of hydrofoil.
noun
0
0
Shortened form of aerofoil/airfoil.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
To prevent (something) from being accomplished.
verb
0
0
To prevent (someone) from accomplishing something.
verb
0
0
To blunt; to dull; to spoil.

To foil the scent in hunting.

verb
0
0
Spenser.

Whom he did all to pieces breake and foyle, / In filthy durt, and left so in the loathely soyle.

verb
0
0
Failure when on the point of attainment; defeat; frustration; miscarriage.

noun
0
0
Advertisement
(hunting) The track of an animal.
noun
0
0
(mathematics) To multiply two binomials together.
verb
0
0
(obsolete) To defile; to soil.
verb
0
0
A particular algorithm for multiplying two binomials.
pronoun
0
0
To apply the FOIL algorithm to.
verb
0
0
Advertisement

Origin of foil

  • Middle English from Old French foille from Latin folia pl. of folium leaf bhel-3 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English foilen to trample, defile variant of filen to defile file3

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Origin unknown

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English foilen (“spoil a scent trail by crossing it”), from Old French fouler (“tread on, trample”), ultimately from Latin fullo (“clothes cleaner, fuller”).

    From Wiktionary

  • From Old French fueille (“plant leaf”), from Latin folia, the plural of folium, mistaken as a singular feminine.

    From Wiktionary

  • Acronym of first outer inner last or similar.

    From Wiktionary

  • From mnemonic acronym FOIL (“First Outside Inside Last”).

    From Wiktionary

  • From French foulis.

    From Wiktionary

  • See file.

    From Wiktionary