Bracket meaning

brăk'ĭt
An architectural support projecting from a wall, as a corbel.
noun
1
0
A decorative or weight-bearing structural unit, two sides of which form a right angle with one arm flush against a wall and the other flush beneath a projecting surface, such as eaves or a bay window.
noun
0
0
A wall-anchored fixture for gas or electricity.
noun
0
0
One of a pair of parentheses.
noun
0
0
A classification or grouping, especially within a sequence of numbers or grades, as a category of incomes sharing the same tax rate.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
To furnish or support with a bracket or brackets.
verb
0
0
To place within or as if within brackets.
verb
0
0
To classify or group together.
verb
0
0
To include or exclude by establishing specific boundaries.
verb
0
0
To fire beyond and short of (a target) in order to determine artillery range.
verb
0
0
Advertisement
Any angle-shaped support, esp. one in the form of a right triangle.
noun
0
0
A wall shelf or shelves held up by brackets.
noun
0
0
A wall fixture, as for a small electric lamp.
noun
0
0
Either of the pair of signs [ ], or sometimes < >, used to enclose a word or words inserted as for explanation, quantities to be taken as a single quantity, etc.
noun
0
0
The part of a classified, graded grouping that falls within specified limits.

The $30,000 to $40,000 income bracket.

noun
0
0
Advertisement
To provide or support with brackets.
verb
0
0
To enclose within brackets.
verb
0
0
To group, classify, or associate together.

Grant and Lee are bracketed in history.

verb
0
0
To establish a bracket for (an artillery target)
verb
0
0
In programming, brackets (the [ and ] characters) are used to enclose numbers and subscripts. For example, in the C statement int menustart [4] = {2,9,15,22}; the [4] indicates the number of elements in the array, and the contents are enclosed in curly braces. In the C expression, if (ABCbuff [501] == '\x1'), the [501] indicates the 501st byte of the ABC buffer (starting with 0). See also bracketing.
0
0
Advertisement
​A fixture attached to a wall to hold up a shelf.
noun
0
0
(engineering) Any intermediate object that connects a smaller part to a larger part, the smaller part typically projecting sideways from the larger part.
noun
0
0
(nautical) A short crooked timber, resembling a knee, used as a support.
noun
0
0
(military) The cheek or side of an ordnance carriage.
noun
0
0
Any of the characters "(", ")", "[", "]", "{", "}", and, in the area of computer languages, "<" and ">".
noun
0
0
Advertisement
"(" and ")" specifically, the other forms above requiring adjectives for disambiguation.
noun
0
0
(technical) "[" and "]" specifically - opposed to the other forms of which have their own technical names.
noun
0
0
(sports) Printed diagram of games in a tournament.
noun
0
0
(sports) Prediction of the outcome of games in a tournament, used for betting purposes.
noun
0
0
One of several ranges of numbers.

Tax bracket, age bracket.

noun
0
0
Advertisement
(military) In artillery, the endangered region between two shell impacts (one long and one short). The next shell fired is likely to hit accurately.
noun
0
0
To bound on both sides, to surround as enclosing with brackets.

I tried to hit the bullseye by first bracketing it with two shots and then splitting the difference with my third, but I missed.

verb
0
0
To place in the same category.

Because the didn't have enough young boys for two full teams, they bracketed the seven-year olds with the eight-year olds.

verb
0
0
To mark distinctly for special treatment.
verb
0
0
To set aside, discount, ignore.
verb
0
0
Advertisement
(photography) To take multiple images of the same subject, using a range of exposure settings, in order to help ensure that a satisfactory image is obtained.
verb
0
0
(philosophy, phenomenology) In the philosophical system of Edmund Husserl and his followers, to set aside metaphysical theories and existential questions concerning what is real in order to focus philosophical attention simply on the actual content of experience.
verb
0
0

Origin of bracket

  • Possibly French braguette codpiece diminutive of brague breeches from Old Provençal braga from Latin brācae from Gaulish brāca leg covering
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From earlier bragget, probably from Middle French braguette, from Old French braguette (“the opening in the fore part of a pair of breeches”), from Old Provençal braga, from Latin brāca (“pants”), from Transalpine Gaulish *brāca (“pants”), perhaps from or related to similar forms in Germanic: compare Old English braccas (“pants”), Old English brōc (“breeches”), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰrāg-, from *bʰreg- (“to break, crack, split, divide”). More at breech, britches.
    From Wiktionary