Sconce meaning

skŏns
A decorative wall bracket for holding candles or lights.
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A small defensive earthwork or fort.
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A flattened candlestick that has a handle.
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The human head or skull.
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A bracket attached to a wall for holding a candle, candles, or the like.
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A small fort, bulwark, etc.
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To provide with a sconce.
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To shelter or protect.
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To fine; esp., at Oxford University, to fine lightly for a breach of manners.
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Such a fine.
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A light fixture.
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A head or a skull.
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A poll tax; a mulct or fine.

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A piece of armour for the head; headpiece; helmet.
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(obsolete) To impose a fine, a forfeit, or a mulct.
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A type of small fort or other fortification, especially as built to defend a pass or ford.
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The circular tube, with a brim, in a candlestick, into which the candle is inserted.
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(architecture) A squinch.
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A fragment of a floe of ice.

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A fixed seat or shelf.
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(obsolete) To shut within a sconce; to imprison.
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Origin of sconce

  • Middle English from Old French esconse lantern, hiding place from Medieval Latin scōnsa from Latin abscōnsa feminine past participle of abscondere to hide away ab-, abs- away ab–1 condere to preserve dhē- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Dutch schans from German Schanze from Middle High German

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From French esconce (“lantern"), from Latin absconsus (“hidden"), perfect passive participle of abscondō (“hide"). Cognate with abscond.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle Dutch schans, cognate with German Schanze.

    From Wiktionary