Scone meaning

skōn, skŏn
Frequency:
A village of central Scotland northeast of Perth. The old part of the village was the coronation site of Scottish kings until 1651. The Stone of Scone, or Stone of Destiny, which served as a throne during the coronation rites, was taken to England by Edward I in 1296 and kept in Westminster Abbey beneath the chair used during the crowning of British monarchs. The Stone of Scone was returned to Scotland in November 1996.
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A small, rich, biscuitlike pastry or quick bread, sometimes baked on a griddle.
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(utah) Yeast bread dough, deep-fried and served with honey and butter or with a savory filling.
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A kind of sweet biscuit made with baking powder, eggs, fruit, nuts, etc., orig. baked on a griddle, and served with butter.
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A small, rich, pastry or quick bread, sometimes baked on a griddle.
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(Utah) Frybread served with honey butter spread on the cooked bread.
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(Australia, NZ) To hit, especially on the head.
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A village north of Perth in Scotland; the coronation site of Scottish kings until 1651
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(place) Village in E Scotland northeast of Perth: site of an abbey that contained the stone (Stone of Scone) on which Scottish kings before 1296 were crowned: removed by Edward I and placed under the coronation chair at Westminster Abbey, the stone was returned to Scotland in 1996
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Origin of scone

  • Perhaps from Dutch schoonbrood fine white bread from Middle Dutch schoonbroot schoon bright broot bread

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Originally Scottish, probably a contraction of Middle Low German schonbrot, Middle Dutch schoonbroot (“fine bread").

    From Wiktionary