Breech meaning

brēch
Frequency:
The lower rear portion of the human trunk; the buttocks.
noun
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The part of a firearm behind the barrel.
noun
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The lower part of a pulley block.
noun
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The buttocks; rump.
noun
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The lower or back part of a thing.
  • The lower end of a pulley block.
  • The back end of the barrel of a gun.
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To clothe with breeches.
verb
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To provide (a gun) with a breech.
verb
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The lower rear portion of the human trunk; the buttocks.
noun
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(historical, now only in the plural) A garment whose purpose is to cover or clothe the buttocks. [from 11th c.]
noun
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(now rare) The buttocks or backside. [from 16th c.]
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The part of a cannon or other firearm behind the chamber. [from 16th c.]
noun
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(nautical) The external angle of knee timber, the inside of which is called the throat.
noun
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A breech birth.
noun
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With the hips coming out before the head.
adverb
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Born, or having been born, breech.
adjective
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(dated) To dress in breeches. (especially) To dress a boy in breeches or trousers for the first time.
verb
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(dated) To beat or spank on the buttocks.
verb
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To fit or furnish with a breech.

To breech a gun.

verb
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To fasten with breeching.
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Origin of breech

  • Middle English brech from Old English brēc pl. of brōc leg covering Gaulish brāca hose, trousers

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Old English brēċ, plural of *brōc, from Proto-Germanic *brōks (“clothing for loins and thighs”). Cognate with Dutch broek, Alemannic German Brüch, Swedish brok.

    From Wiktionary