More definitions

môr
More means a larger amount or greater number of things.

An example of more is when you have two cats and you get a third cat.

pronoun
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Additional; extra.

She needs some more time.

adjective
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A greater or additional quantity, number, degree, or amount.

The more I see of you the more I like you.

noun
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A greater or additional number of persons or things.

I opened only two bottles but more were in the refrigerator.

pronoun
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More is defined as something done again, or something that is done or felt to a larger extent.

An example of more means you go down the slide once again.

An example of more means that you prefer dogs to cats.

adverb
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In addition.

Phoned twice more.

adverb
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Moreover; furthermore.
adverb
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To or in a greater extent or degree.

Loved him even more.

adverb
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Used to form the comparative of many adjectives and adverbs.

More difficult; more softly.

adverb
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Greater in amount, degree, or number.

We have more time than we thought.

adjective
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Additional; further.

Take more tea.

adjective
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A greater amount, quantity, or degree.
noun
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Something additional or further.

More can be said.

noun
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Something of greater importance.
noun
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A greater number (of persons or things)

More of us are going.

noun
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A greater number of persons or things.
noun
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In or to a greater degree or extent.

More satisfying, more intensely.

adverb
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In addition; further; again; longer.
adverb
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1745-1833; Eng. writer, esp. of religious tracts.
proper name
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1478-1535; Eng. statesman & writer: executed: canonized in 1935
proper name
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Comparative form of many: in greater number. (Used for a discrete quantity.)

More people are arriving; there are more ways to do this than I can count.

determiner
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Comparative form of much: in greater quantity, amount, or proportion. (Used for a continuous quantity.)

I want more soup; I need more time.

There's more caffeine in my coffee than in the coffee you get in most places.

determiner
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To a greater degree or extent. [from 10th c.]

He walks more in the morning these days.

adverb
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(now poetic) In negative constructions: any further, any longer; any more. [from 10th c.]
adverb
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Used alone to form the comparative form of adjectives and adverbs. [from 13th c.]
  • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 5, The Celebrity.
    Then we relapsed into a discomfited silence, and wished we were anywhere else. But Miss Thorn relieved the situation by laughing aloud, and with such a hearty enjoyment that instead of getting angry and more mortified we began to laugh ourselves, and instantly felt better.
  • 2013 July-August, Henry Petroski, “Geothermal Energy", American Scientist, volume 101, number 4:"Š.
    Ancient nomads, wishing to ward off the evening chill and enjoy a meal around a campfire, had to collect wood and then spend time and effort coaxing the heat of friction out from between sticks to kindle a flame. With more settled people, animals were harnessed to capstans or caged in treadmills to turn grist into meal.

You're more beautiful than I ever imagined.

adverb
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(now dialectal or humorous) Used in addition to an inflected comparative form. (Standard until the 18th century.) [from 13th c.]

No more than a disagreement from a friend.

adverb
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(dialectal) A root; stock.
noun
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noun
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To root up.
verb
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The Volta-Congo language of the Mossi people, mainly spoken in part of Burkina Faso.
pronoun
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pronoun
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(archaic) Used to form a comparative of certain adjectives and adverbs, usually ending in -er.
suffix
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Used for placenames.
suffix
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Greater in number.

A hall with more seats.

adjective
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1
Greater in size, amount, extent, or degree.

More land; more support.

adjective
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1
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Origin of more

From Middle English more, from Old English māra (“more"), from Proto-Germanic *maizô (“more"), from Proto-Indo-European *mÄ“- (“many"). Cognate with Scots mair (“more"), West Frisian mear (“more"), Dutch meer (“more"), Low German mehr (“more"), German mehr (“more"), Danish mere (“more"), Swedish mera (“more"), Icelandic meiri, meira (“more").