Mortal meaning

môrtl
Frequency:
(theol.) Causing spiritual death.
adjective
8
1
A human.
noun
7
0
Of a human being considered as a being who must eventually die.
adjective
6
1
That must eventually die.

All mortal beings.

adjective
5
1
To the death.

Mortal combat.

adjective
2
0
Advertisement
A being who must eventually die; esp., a human being; person.
noun
2
0
Of death.
adjective
2
1
Not to be pacified.

A mortal enemy.

adjective
2
1
(dial.) Extremely.
adverb
1
0
Causing death; deadly; fatal.
adjective
1
1
Advertisement
The definition of mortal is something that is likely to cause death, or someone that has the ability to die.

A bullet to the heart is an example of something you would describe as a mortal wound.

An example of something you would describe as mortal is humans, who can die, as opposed to Gods who cannot die.

adjective
0
0
Susceptible to death by aging, sickness, injury, or wound; not immortal. [from 14th c.]
adjective
0
0
Causing death; deadly, fatal, killing, lethal (now only of wounds, injuries etc.). [from 14th c.]
adjective
0
0
Fatally vulnerable; vital.
adjective
0
0
Of or relating to the time of death.
adjective
0
0
Advertisement
Affecting as if with power to kill; deathly.
adjective
0
0
Human; belonging to man, who is mortal.

Mortal wit or knowledge; mortal power.

adjective
0
0
Very painful or tedious; wearisome.

A sermon lasting two mortal hours.

adjective
0
0
(UK, slang) Very drunk; wasted; smashed.

Let's go out and get mortal!

adjective
0
0
A human; someone susceptible to death.

Her wisdom was beyond that of a mere mortal.

noun
0
0
Advertisement
0
0
Of this world.
adjective
0
1
Very intense; grievous.

Mortal terror.

adjective
0
1

Origin of mortal

  • Middle English from Old French from Latin mortālis from mors mort- death mer- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Anglo-Norman mortal, Middle French mortal, and their source Latin mortālis, from mors (“death").

    From Wiktionary