Left definition

lĕft
Of the side or bank of a river on the left of a person facing downstream.
adjective
9
3
Simple past tense and past participle of leave..
verb
3
1
noun
4
3
Left is defined as something remaining or to have gone away.

An example of being left is a lone tomato hanging on a plant.

An example of having left is to have walked out of the office.

verb
1
0
Of, belonging to, located on, or being the side of the body to the north when the subject is facing east.
adjective
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0
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Of, relating to, directed toward, or located on the left side.
adjective
1
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Located on the left side of a person facing downstream.

The left bank of a river.

adjective
1
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Toward or on the left.
adverb
1
0
Of the political left; communist, socialist, liberal, etc.
adjective
1
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Designating or of that side of one's body which is toward the west when one faces north, the side of the less-used hand in most people.
adjective
1
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Designating or of the corresponding side of anything.
adjective
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Closer to the left side of a person directly before and facing the thing mentioned or understood.

The top left drawer of a desk.

adjective
1
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On or toward the left hand or side.
adverb
1
0
The opposite of right; toward the west when one is facing north.

Turn left at the corner.

adjective
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(politics) Pertaining to the political left; liberal.
adjective
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On the left side.
adverb
1
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Towards the left side.
adverb
1
0

There are only three cups of juice left.

verb
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(Ireland, colloquial) Permitted, allowed to proceed.

We were not left go to the beach after school except on a weekend.

verb
1
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The definition of left is a person on the liberal side of politics or on the opposite side from the right side.

An example of being on the political left is a pro-choice person.

An example of the left hand is the less commonly used hand by most persons.

adjective
2
2
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Of or belonging to the political or intellectual left.
adjective
1
1
verb
1
1
(sports) A blow delivered by a boxer's left hand.
noun
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(baseball) Left field.
noun
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0
The direction or position on the left side.
noun
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The left side.
noun
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The left hand.
noun
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A turn in the direction of the left hand or side.
noun
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The people and groups who advocate liberal, often radical measures to effect change in the established order, especially in politics, with the goal of achieving the equality, freedom, and well-being of the common citizens of a state.
noun
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The opinion of those advocating such measures.
noun
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(politics) A liberal or radical position, esp. one varying from moderate socialism to communism, or a party or group advocating this.
noun
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All or part of the left side.
noun
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What is on the left side.
noun
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A direction or location on the left side.
noun
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0
A turn toward the left side.
noun
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0
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The left hand.
noun
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0
A blow delivered with the left hand.
noun
0
0
The left side or direction.
noun
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0
(politics) The ensemble of left-wing political parties. Those holding left-wing views as a group.

The political left is not holding enough power.

noun
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(boxing) A punch delivered with the left fist.
noun
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have two left feet
  • to be very clumsy, specif., to be a clumsy dancer
idiom
1
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Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
left
Plural:
lefts

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

have two left feet

Origin of left

  • Middle English from Old English lyft- weak, useless (in lyftādl paralysis) N., sense 2, from the fact that liberals often sit on the left side of the legislative chamber in various assemblies

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English left, luft, leoft, lift, lyft, from Old English left, lyft (“weak, useless"), from Proto-Germanic *luft- (compare Scots left (“left"), North Frisian lefts, leeft, leefts (“left"), West Frisian lofts (“left"), dialectal Dutch loof (“weak, worthless"), dialectal Low German lucht (“left"), from *lubjanÄ… "to castrate, lop off" (compare dialectal English lib, West Frisian lobje, Dutch lubben), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)leup, *(s)lup "hanging limply". More at lob, lop.

    From Wiktionary

  • From a verbal use of leave (“permission"), perhaps connected to Middle English leven (“to give leave to, permit, concede"), from Old English lÄ«efan, lȳfan (“to allow"). More at leave.

    From Wiktionary

  • Middle English left, variant of laft (“remaining, left"), from Old English lÇ£fd, Ä¡elÇ£fd, past participle of lÇ£fan (“to leave"). More at leave.

    From Wiktionary