Loof meaning

(anatomy, now chiefly dialectal, Northern England, Scotland) The hand, especially, the hand outspread and upturned.
noun
2
0
(anatomy, now chiefly dialectal, Northern England, Scotland) The palm of the hand.
noun
0
0
(nautical) The after part of the bow of a ship where the sides begin to curve.
noun
0
0
The spongy fibers of the fruit of a cucurbitaceous plant (Luffa aegyptiaca).
noun
0
0
Advertisement

Origin of loof

  • From Middle English lufe, lofe (“palm of the hand”), from Old English *lōfa, from Proto-Germanic *lōfô (“palm of the hand; paw; oar blade, paddle”), from Proto-Indo-European *lāp-, *lēp- (“to be flat”). Cognate with Scots luif (“the palm of the hand”), Swedish love (“wrist”), Icelandic lófi (“palm of the hand”), Gothic [script?] (lófa, “palm of the hand”), German dialectal Laffe (“flat hand, palm”). Related to glove.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English lof (“a contrivance for altering a ship's course, paddle, oar”), from Middle Dutch loef (“an oar or paddle used in steering”), ultimately from the same origin as Etymology 1.

    From Wiktionary