Glove meaning

glŭv
To cover with or as if with a glove.
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To cover with or as with a glove.
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(idiomatic) Condom.
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Fielding ability.

A shortstop with a good glove.

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A close-fitting covering for the hand with a separate sheath for each finger and the thumb, worn especially as protection from the cold.
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A gauntlet.
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An oversized leather glove used for catching baseballs, especially one with more finger sheaths than the catcher's or first baseman's mitt.
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A glove made of leather and fabric having padding on the back and extending over the wrist, used in hockey and lacrosse.
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A boxing glove.
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A close-fitting glove used to improve the grip, as in batting or in golf.
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To furnish with gloves.
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To don gloves, as before performing an operation on a patient.
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A covering for the hand, made of leather, cloth, etc., with a separate sheath for each finger and the thumb.
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A similar covering of padded leather worn by players in the field.
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The ability to field a batted or thrown ball.
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To supply with gloves.
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To catch (a ball) with a glove.
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An item of clothing other than a mitten, covering all or part of the hand and fingers, but allowing independent movement of the fingers.

I wore gloves to keep my hands warm.

The boxing champ laced on his gloves before the big bout.

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(baseball, figuratively) The ability to catch a hit ball.

Frederico had a great glove, but he couldn't hit a curveball, so he never broke into the pros.

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(baseball) To catch the ball in a baseball mitt.

He gloved the line drive for the third out.

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To put on a glove.

Maxwell gloved his hand so that he wouldn't leave fingerprints, then pulled the trigger.

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Origin of glove

From Middle English glove, glofe, from Old English glōf, *glōfe, *glōfa, ("glove"; weak forms attested only in plural form glōfan (“gloves”)), from Proto-Germanic *galōfô (“glove”), from Proto-Germanic *ga- (“collective and associative prefix”) + Proto-Germanic *lōfô (“flat of the hand, palm”), from Proto-Indo-European *lāp-, *lēp-, *lep- (“flat”). Cognate with Scots gluve, gluive (“glove”), Icelandic glófi (“glove”). Related to Middle English lofe, lufe (“palm of the hand”). More at loof.