Gauntlet meaning

gôntlĭt, gänt-
Frequency:
Simultaneous attack from two or more sides.
noun
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(figuratively) Any challenging, difficult, or painful ordeal, often one performed for atonement or punishment.
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The definition of a gauntlet is glove or an intimidating, frightening, and sometimes dangerous thing that must be endured or gone through in order to reach a desired place or an end goal.

An example of gauntlet is a long glove with a flared cuff which is worn for protection.

An example of gauntlet is a form of punishment when a person is forced to run between two rows of people who are armed with sticks which they use to strike out at the runner.

noun
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A protective glove, usually extending over some of the forearm, worn as part of medieval armor.
noun
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A challenge.

Throw down the gauntlet; take up the gauntlet.

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A dress glove cuffed above the wrist.
noun
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A medieval glove, usually of leather covered with metal plates, worn by knights in armor to protect the hand in combat.
noun
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Protective armor for the hands.
noun
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(nautical) A rope on which hammocks or clothes are hung for drying.
noun
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(archaic) Two parallel rows of attackers who strike at a criminal as punishment.
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(rail transport) A temporary convergence of two parallel railroad tracks allowing passage through a narrow opening in each direction without switching.
noun
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Any of various protective gloves, usually with an extended or flared cuff, as used in certain sports such as fencing and motorcycle riding, in cooking to handle hot objects, and other activities.
noun
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take up the gauntlet
  • to accept a challenge
  • to undertake the defense of a person, etc.
idiom
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throw down the gauntlet
  • to challenge, as to combat
idiom
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Origin of gauntlet

  • Alteration (influenced by gauntlet) of gantlope from Swedish gatlopp gata lane (from Old Norse ghē- in Indo-European roots) lopp course, running (from Middle Low German lōp)

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English from Old French gantelet diminutive of gant glove from Frankish want

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English "glove", also gantelet, from Old French gantelet (“gauntlet worn by a knight in armor, a token of one's personality or person, and symbolizing a challenge”), diminutive of gant (“glove”)

    From Wiktionary

  • From gantlope, from Swedish gatlopp (“passageway”), from Old Swedish gata (“lane”) + lopp (“course”), from löpa (“to run”)

    From Wiktionary