Flame meaning

flām
To burst forth like flame; to break out in violence of passion; to be kindled with zeal or ardour.
verb
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Flame is defined as to burn or light up, or to criticize harshly.

An example of flame is to light a match.

An example of flame is to continuously scream at someone.

verb
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A violent or intense passion.
noun
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A person that one has an intense passion for.
noun
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To burn brightly; blaze.
verb
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The definition of a flame is burning gas, fire or blaze, or a strong passion.

An example of a flame is a fire from a lighter.

An example of a flame is an intense desire for a particular person.

noun
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The zone of burning gases and fine suspended matter associated with rapid combustion; a hot, glowing mass of burning gas or vapor.
noun
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The condition of active, blazing combustion.

Burst into flame.

noun
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Something resembling a flame in motion, brilliance, intensity, or shape.
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An insulting criticism or remark meant to incite anger, as on a computer network.
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To color or flash suddenly.

Cheeks that flamed with embarrassment.

verb
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To make insulting criticisms or remarks, as on a computer network, to incite anger.
verb
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To burn, ignite, or scorch (something) with a flame.
verb
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To insult or criticize provokingly, as on a computer network.
verb
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To excite; inflame.
verb
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The burning gas or vapor of a fire, seen as a flickering light of various colors; blaze.
noun
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A tongue of light rising from a fire.
noun
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The state of burning with a blaze of light.

To burst into flame.

noun
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An intense emotion; strong passion.
noun
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An angry, insulting, or harshly critical electronic message.
noun
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A sweetheart.
noun
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A thing like a flame in heat, brilliance, etc.
noun
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Brilliance or bright coloring.
noun
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To burn with a blaze of light; burst into flame.
verb
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To light up with color as if blazing; grow red or hot.

A face flaming with anger.

verb
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To show intense emotion; become very excited.
verb
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To send an angry, insulting, or harshly critical electronic message.
verb
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To burn or heat with flame.
verb
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To treat with flame.
verb
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To attack, insult, or harshly criticize by means of an electronic message.
verb
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To douse with alcoholic liquor and set afire.

Flame the roast with brandy.

verb
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The hot, glowing mixture of burning gases and tiny particles that arises from combustion. Flames get their light either from the fluorescence of molecules or ions that have become excited, or from the incandescence of solid particles involved in the combustion process, such as the carbon particles from a candle.
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To communicate emotionally via electronic means. Just as people might argue what is polite behavior and what is not, whether an email message or blog post is flaming or not is also in the eye of the beholder. Vulgar cursing would definitely be flaming, however. See netiquette, Internet troll, flame war and holy war.
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The visible part of fire; a stream of burning vapour or gas, emitting light and heat.
noun
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A romantic partner or lover in a usually short-lived but passionate affair.
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(Internet) Intentionally insulting criticism or remark meant to incite anger.
noun
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A brilliant reddish orange-gold fiery colour.
noun
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(music, chiefly lutherie) The contrasting light and dark figure seen in wood used for stringed instrument making; the curl.

The cello has a two-piece back with a beautiful narrow flame.

noun
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noun
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To produce flames; to burn with a flame or blaze.
verb
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(Internet, intransitive) To post a destructively critical or abusive message (to somebody).

I flamed him for spamming in my favourite newsgroup.

verb
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Of a brilliant reddish orange-gold colour, like that of a flame.
adjective
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Origin of flame

Middle English flaume, flaumbe, blend of Anglo-Norman flame and flambe, flamble, the first from Latin flamma, the second from Latin flammula, diminutive of flamma, both from pre-Latin *fladma; akin to Old English glēd (“ember”); ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *bʰlē- (“to shimmer, gleam, shine”).