Abate Definition

ə-bāt
abated, abates, abating
verb
abated, abates, abating
To make less in amount, degree, force, etc.
Webster's New World
To become less in amount, degree, force, etc.; diminish.
Webster's New World
To deduct.
Webster's New World
To put a stop to (a suit or action), end (a nuisance), etc.; terminate.
Webster's New World
To make void.
The judge abated the lawsuit.
American Heritage
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noun
To end, eliminate, do away with, or make null and void. To diminish, decrease, or lessen in degree or amount. The reduction of a bequest or devise made in a will because the combined value of all bequests and devises, and/or the debts owed by a testator, exceed the assets in the testator’s estate. The rebate or reduction of taxes already assessed and/or paid.
Webster's New World Law

(obsolete) Abatement. [Attested from around (1350 to 1470) until the late 17th century.]

Wiktionary

An Italian abbot, or other member of the clergy. [First attested in the early 18th century.]

Wiktionary

Other Word Forms of Abate

Noun

Singular:
abate
Plural:
abates

Origin of Abate

  • From Middle English abaten, from Old French abatre (“to beat down”) (possibly via Middle French), from Late Latin abbatto, from ab- (“away”) + batto, from Latin battuere (“to beat”). Cognate to modern French abattre.

    From Wiktionary

  • Middle English abaten from Old French abattre to beat down a- to (from Latin ad- ad–) batre to beat batter1

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Italian abate, from Latin abbās, abbātis, from Ancient Greek ἀββᾶς (abbas), from Aramaic אבא (’abbā, “father”).

    From Wiktionary

  • From Anglo-Norman abatre, an alteration of enbatre, from Old French en + batre (“to beat”).

    From Wiktionary

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