Truck meaning

trŭk
The definition of a truck is a small block or disk used as support to pull a flag or sail to the top of a pole.

An example of a truck is a metal disk at the top of a flag pole that helps when pulling up a flag.

noun
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Truck is a motorized vehicle with an open bed used for transporting, or is short for hand truck, which is a cart used for transporting heavy objects.

An example of a truck is the vehicle that the character Marty Mcfly drove in the movie Back to the Future.

An example of a truck is what someone would use to move a refrigerator; a hand truck.

noun
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To move or travel in a steady but easy manner.
verb
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(intransitive) To have dealings or social relationships with; to engage with.
verb
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(usually with negative) Social intercourse; dealings, relationships.
noun
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Truck is defined as to transport using an open bed vehicle or be a truck driver.

An example of to truck is driving a semi cross country for work.

verb
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A small, wooden disk at the top of a ship's mast or flagpole, usually with holes for halyards.
noun
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Dealings.

Have no further truck with them.

noun
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Any of various heavy motor vehicles designed for carrying or pulling loads.
noun
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A hand truck.
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A small piece of wood placed at the top of a mast or flagpole, usually having holes through which halyards can be passed.
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A railroad freight car without a top.
noun
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To transport by truck.
verb
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To carry goods by truck.
verb
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To drive a truck.
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To have dealings or commerce; traffic.

They were trucking with smugglers.

verb
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To exchange; barter.
verb
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To peddle.
verb
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The trading of goods or services without the exchange of money; barter.
noun
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Dealings; business.

We'll have no further truck with them.

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A small, solid wheel or roller, esp. one for a gun carriage.
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noun
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Any of various low frames or platforms on wheels, sometimes motor-driven, for carrying heavy articles, as in a warehouse.
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An automotive vehicle for hauling loads along highways, streets, etc.; motor truck.
noun
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A swiveling frame with two or more pairs of wheels, usually provided with brakes and springs, forming the wheel unit under each end of a railroad car, streetcar, etc.
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An open railroad freight car.
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To carry or transport on a truck or trucks.
verb
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To do trucking.
verb
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To drive a truck as one's work.
verb
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To walk in a carefree, leisurely manner; stroll.
verb
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To exchange; barter.
verb
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To peddle.
verb
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noun
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Payment of wages in goods produced instead of money.
noun
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Small commercial articles.
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Small articles of little value.
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Vegetables raised for sale in markets.
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Trash; rubbish.
noun
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(intransitive, now chiefly dialectal) To fail; run out; run short; be unavailable; diminish; abate.
verb
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(intransitive, now chiefly dialectal) To give in; give way; knuckle under; truckle.
verb
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(intransitive, now chiefly dialectal) To deceive; cheat; defraud.
verb
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A small wheel or roller, specifically the wheel of a gun-carriage.
noun
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The ball on top of a flagpole.
noun
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(nautical) On a wooden mast, a circular disc (sometimes a rectangle) of wood near or at the top of the mast, usually with holes or sheaves to reeve signal halyards; also a temporary or emergency place for a lookout. "Main" refers to the mainmast, whereas a truck on another mast may be called (on the mizzenmast, for example) "mizzen-truck".
noun
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(countable, uncountable, US, Australia) A semi-tractor ("semi") trailer; (UK) a lorry.

Mexican open-bed trucks haul most of the fresh produce that comes into the United States from Mexico.

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Any motor vehicle designed for carrying cargo, including delivery vans, pickups, and other motorized vehicles (including passenger autos) fitted with a bed designed to carry goods.
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A garden cart, a two-wheeled wheelbarrow.
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1906, Upton Sinclair, The Jungle, Chapter 3

From the doors of these rooms went men with loaded trucks, to the platform where freight cars were waiting to be filled; and one went out there and realized with a start that he had come at last to the ground floor of this enormous building.

noun
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A pantechnicon (removal van).
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(UK) A flatbed railway car.
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A pivoting frame, one attached to the bottom of the bed of a railway car at each end, that rests on the axle and which swivels to allow the axle (at each end of which is a solid wheel) to turn with curves in the track. The axle on many types of railway car is not attached to the truck and relies on gravity to remain within the truck's brackets (on the truck's base) that hold the axle in place.
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The part of a skateboard or roller skate that joins the wheels to the deck, consisting of a hanger, baseplate, kingpin, and bushings, and sometimes mounted with a riser in between.
noun
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(theater) A platform with wheels or casters.
noun
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Dirt or other messiness.
noun
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(intransitive) To drive a truck.
verb
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To convey by truck.
verb
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(intransitive, US, slang, 1960s) To travel or live contentedly.

Keep on trucking!

verb
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(intransitive, US, slang, 1960s) To persist, to endure.

Keep on trucking!

verb
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(intransitive, film production) To move a camera parallel to the movement of the subject.
verb
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(slang) To run over or through a tackler in American football.
verb
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(UK dialectal, Scotland) To tread (down); stamp on; trample (down).
verb
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verb
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(intransitive) To engage in commerce; to barter or deal.
verb
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1911, Edna Ferber, chapter 5, Dawn O'Hara, the Girl who Laughed.

It happened in this way, on a day when I was indulging in a particularly greenery-yallery fit of gloom. Norah rushed into my room. I think I was mooning over some old papers, or letters, or ribbons, or some such truck in the charming, knife-turning way that women have when they are blue.

noun
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(US) Garden produce, groceries (see truck garden).
noun
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Pertaining to a garden patch or truck garden.
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Origin of truck

  • Short for truckle or from Latin trochus iron hoop (from Greek trokhos wheel)

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English trukien from Old North French troquer

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English truken, troken, trukien, from Old English trucian (“to fail, run short, deceive, disappoint"), from Proto-Germanic *trukōnÄ… (“to fail, miss, lack"), from Proto-Indo-European *dereu-, *derwu- (“to tear, wrap, reap"), from Proto-Indo-European *der- (“to flay, split"). Cognate with Middle Low German troggelen (“to cheat, deceive, swindle"), Dutch troggelen (“to extort"), German dialectal truggeln (“to flatter, fawn").

    From Wiktionary

  • From dialectal truck, truk, trokk, probably of North Germanic origin, compare Norwegian dialectal trokka, trakka (“to stamp, trample, go to and fro"), Danish trykke (“to press, press down, crush, squeeze"). More at thrutch.

    From Wiktionary

  • Middle English trukien, from unrecorded Anglo-Norman and Old French words (attested in mediaeval Latin trocare, present Spanish trocar), of Unknown origin.

    From Wiktionary

  • Perhaps a shortening of truckle, related to Latin trochus (“iron hoop, wheel").

    From Wiktionary