Bate meaning

bāt
To lessen by retrenching, deducting, or reducing; to abate; to beat down; to lower.
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noun
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To flap the wings wildly or frantically. Used of a falcon.
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To abate, lessen, lower, etc.
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(archaic) To deprive (of)
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(tanning) To soften by soaking in an enzyme solution after the hair has been removed.
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An enzyme solution for this purpose.
noun
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To reduce the force of something; to abate.
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To restrain, usually with the sense of being in anticipation; as, with bated breath.
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(sometimes figuratively) To cut off, remove, take away.
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(archaic) To leave out, except, bar.
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To waste away.

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To deprive of.
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To allow by way of abatement or deduction.
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(intransitive) To contend or strive with blows or arguments.
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(intransitive, falconry) Of a falcon: To flap the wings vigorously; to bait.

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An alkaline lye which neutralizes the effect of the previous application of lime, and makes hides supple in the process of tanning.
noun
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A vat which contains this liquid.
noun
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To soak leather so as to remove chemicals used in tanning; to steep in bate.
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(intransitive, slang) To masturbate.
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(nonstandard) Simple past tense of beat; = beat.
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To bate is defined as to lower, hold back or restrain.

To try not to smile when someone tells a funny joke is to bate the desire to laugh.

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To lessen the force or intensity of; moderate.
verb
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To take away; subtract.
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with bated breath
  • with the breath held in because of fear, excitement, etc.
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of bate

  • Middle English baten from Old French batre to beat batter1

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English baten short for abaten abate

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Formed by analogy with eatate, with which it shares an analogous past participle (eatenbeaten).

    From Wiktionary

  • Verb: From Anglo-Saxon = contention. From Old French batre (French battre). From Late Latin batere.

    From Wiktionary

  • Noun: From the verb, or directly from the noun debate.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Swedish beta (“maceration, tanning”)

    From Wiktionary

  • Aphetic from abate.

    From Wiktionary