Jewel definition

jo͝oəl
Any person or thing that is very precious or valuable.
noun
10
1
A precious stone; gem.
noun
6
2
A costly ornament of precious metal or gems.
noun
4
2
A small gem or hard, gemlike bit, used as one of the bearings in a watch.
noun
3
1
The definition of a jewel is a precious gem, or a valuable person or thing.

An example of a jewel is a diamond.

An example of a jewel is an employee who always goes above and beyond their job description.

noun
2
0
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To adorn with jewels.
verb
2
0
A valuable ring, pin, necklace, etc., esp. one set with a gem or gems.
noun
2
0
To fit with jewels.
verb
2
1
Jewel is defined as to add gems to something.

An example of jewel is putting rhinestones on the collar of a jacket.

verb
1
0
(figuratively) Anything considered precious or valuable.

Galveston was the jewel of Texas prior to the hurricane.

noun
1
0
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One that is treasured or esteemed.
noun
0
0
A precious stone; a gem.
noun
0
0
A small natural or artificial gem used as a bearing in a watch.
noun
0
0
A precious or semi-precious stone; gem, gemstone.
noun
0
0
A valuable object used for personal ornamentation, especially one made of precious metals and stones; a piece of jewellery.
noun
0
0
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A bearing for a pivot in a watch, formed of a crystal or precious stone.
noun
0
0
To bejewel; to decorate or bedeck with jewels or gems.
verb
0
0
A female given name from the noun jewel, used since the end of the 19th century.
pronoun
0
0
A male given name, a variant of Jewell, or from "jewel" like the female name.
pronoun
0
0
To decorate or set with jewels.
verb
0
1
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Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
jewel
Plural:
jewels

Origin of jewel

  • Middle English juel from Anglo-Norman perhaps from Vulgar Latin iocāle from neuter of *iocālis of play from Latin iocus joke yek- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Anglo-Norman juel, from Old French jouel (modern joyau), based ultimately on Latin iocus (“joke, jest”).

    From Wiktionary