Infant meaning

ĭn'fənt
A child in the earliest period of life, especially before he or she can walk.
noun
0
0
A person under the legal age of majority; a minor.
noun
0
0
A very young nonhuman mammal, especially a primate.
noun
0
0
Of or being in infancy.
adjective
0
0
Intended for infants or young children.
adjective
0
0
Advertisement
Newly begun or formed.

An infant enterprise.

adjective
0
0
A very young child; baby.

A chimpanzee infant.

noun
0
0
A person in the state of legal infancy; minor.
noun
0
0
Of or for infants or infancy.
adjective
0
0
In a very early stage.
adjective
0
0
Advertisement
A child in the earliest period of life, especially before he or she can walk.
noun
0
0
A person under the legal age of majority; a minor.
noun
0
0
A very young nonhuman mammal, especially a primate.
noun
0
0
Relating to or being in infancy.
adjective
0
0
Intended for infants or young children.
adjective
0
0
Advertisement
A very young human being, from birth to somewhere between six months and two years of age, needing almost constant care and/or attention.
noun
0
0
(law) A minor.
noun
0
0
(obsolete) To bear or bring forth (a child); to produce, in general.
verb
0
0

Origin of infant

  • Middle English from Old French enfant from Latin īnfāns īnfant- from īnfāns not able to speak, young in- not in–1 fāns present participle of fārī to speak bhā-2 in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Latin īnfantem, accusative masculine singular of īnfāns, nominal use of the adjective meaning 'not able to speak', from īn- (“not”) + fāns, present participle of for (“to speak”). The verb is from Anglo-Norman enfanter, from the same Latin source.
    From Wiktionary