Frail meaning

frāl
Frequency:
Physically weak or delicate.

An invalid's frail body; in frail health.

adjective
18
2
Not strong or substantial; slight.

A frail voice; evidence too frail to stand up in court.

adjective
11
2
The definition of frail is physically weak, fragile or delicate.

An example of someone frail is a sickly old woman with brittle bones.

adjective
10
6
Easily broken or destroyed; fragile.

A flower with a frail stem.

adjective
8
4
Easily led astray; morally weak.
adjective
7
5
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To play a stringed instrument, usually a banjo, by picking with the back of a fingernail.
verb
3
0
Easily broken, shattered, damaged, or destroyed; fragile; delicate.
adjective
2
0
A rush basket for holding fruit, especially dried fruit.
noun
2
1
(dated, slang) A girl.
noun
2
1
The quantity of fruit, such as raisins or figs, that such a basket can hold.
noun
1
0
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Slender and delicate; not robust; weak.
adjective
1
0
A basket made of rushes, for packing figs, raisins, etc.
noun
1
0
Liable to fall from virtue or be led into sin; not strong against temptation; weak in resolution; unchaste.
adjective
1
0
A basket made of rushes, used chiefly for containing figs and raisins.
noun
1
0
The quantity of raisins contained in a frail.
noun
1
0
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A rush for weaving baskets.
noun
1
0
Easily tempted to do wrong; morally weak.
adjective
1
1
Easily broken; mentally or physically fragile; not firm or durable; liable to fail and perish; easily destroyed; not tenacious of life; weak; infirm.
adjective
1
1

Origin of frail

  • Middle English frele from Old French from Latin fragilis from frangere frag- to break bhreg- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English fraiel from Old French

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Old French fraile, from Latin fragilis. Cognate to fraction, fracture, and fragile.

    From Wiktionary