Bland meaning

blănd
Characterized by a moderate, unperturbed, or tranquil quality, especially:
  • Pleasant in manner; smooth.
    A bland smile.
  • Not irritating or stimulating; soothing.
    A bland diet.
  • Exhibiting no personal worry, embarrassment, or concern.
    Told a series of bland lies.
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An agreeable summer beverage prepared from the whey of churned milk, common among the inhabitants of the Shetland Islands.
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(now rare) Mild; soft, gentle, balmy; smooth in manner; suave.
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The definition of bland is something that is lacking in flavor.

An oyster cracker is an example of bland.

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Pleasantly smooth in manner; suave.
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Mild and soothing; not sharp, harsh, etc.

Bland medicine.

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Tasteless, insipid, dull, etc.
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(UK dialectal) To mix; blend; mingle.
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(UK dialectal) To connect; associate.
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(UK dialectal) Mixture; union.
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Having a soothing effect; not irritating or stimulating.

A bland oil.

A bland diet.

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Lacking in taste, flavor, or vigor.

The coffee was bland.

The judge found the defense's case to be bland.

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bland out
  • To remove or omit distinctive characteristics; make or become vapid.
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

bland out

Origin of bland

  • Latin blandus caressing, flattering mel-1 in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Middle English blanden, blonden, from Old English blandan (“to blend, mix, mingle; trouble, disturb, corrupt”), from Proto-Germanic *blandaną (“to mix, blend”), from Proto-Indo-European *bhlendh- (“to grow turbid, dim, see badly, be blind”). Cognate with Danish and Norwegian blande, Swedish blanda (“to mix, mingle, shuffle, blend”), Icelandic blanda (“to mix”). See also blend.
    From Wiktionary
  • From Middle English bland, from Old English bland, blond (“blending, mixture, confusion”), from Proto-Germanic *blandą (“a mixing, mixture”), from Proto-Indo-European *bhlendh- (“to grow turbid, dim, see badly, be blind”). Cognate with Icelandic blanda (“a mixture of liquids, especially of hot whey and water”).
    From Wiktionary
  • Ultimately from Latin blandus (“pleasant, flattering”).
    From Wiktionary