Tenure definition

tĕnyər, -yo͝or
The length of time, or the conditions under which, something is held.
noun
15
3
The act or right of holding property, an office, a position, etc.
noun
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0
The status afforded teachers and professors, long considered a cornerstone of academic freedom of protection against dismissal without adequate cause.
noun
6
1
A period of time during which it is possessed.
noun
3
1
A period during which something is held.
noun
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0
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A general legal protection of a long-term relationship, such as employment.
noun
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A status of possessing a thing or an office; an incumbency.
noun
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A status of having a permanent post with enhanced job security within an academic institution.
noun
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0
A right to hold land under the feudal system.
noun
0
0
To grant tenure, the status of having a permanent academic position, to (someone).
verb
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Tenure is the act or length of time that something is held or the achieved status of having one's employment position become permanent.

An example of tenure is holding a piece of property in your possession only until death as part of a real estate agreement.

An example of tenure is a teacher being guaranteed a job at a school where she's taught for a predetermined amount of time.

noun
2
3
The act, fact, manner, or condition of holding something in one's possession, as real estate or an office; occupation.
noun
0
1
The status of holding one's position on a permanent basis, granted to teachers, civil service personnel, etc. on the fulfillment of specified requirements.
noun
0
1
An ancient hierarchical system of land possession or holding in subordination to a superior.
noun
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1
The status of holding one's position on a permanent basis without periodic contract renewals.

A teacher granted tenure on a faculty.

noun
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Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
tenure
Plural:
tenures

Origin of tenure

  • Middle English from Old French teneure from tenir to hold from Latin tenēre to hold ten- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Anglo-Norman, from Old French teneure, from Vulgar Latin *tenitura, from *tenit(us), from Latin tentus (from teneō) + -ura.

    From Wiktionary