Chivalry meaning

shĭv'əl-rē
The noble qualities a knight was supposed to have, such as courage, honor, and a readiness to help the weak and protect women.
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The medieval system, principles, and customs of knighthood.
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Courteous behavior, especially that of men towards women.
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Chivalry is defined as a quality held by knights and gentlemen offering courage, honor and protection to women.

A man who stands in front of his wife and child during a robbery is an example of chivalry.

A man opening his date's car door for her to get out is an example of chivalry.

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The ethical code of the knight prevalent in Medieval Europe, having such primary virtues as mercy towards the poor and oppressed, humility, honor, sacrifice, fear of God, faithfulness, courage and utmost graciousness and courtesy to ladies.
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(now rare, historical) Cavalry; horsemen armed for battle.
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(UK, law, historical) A tenure of lands by knightly service.
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The definition of chivalry is a group of knights or gentlemen or the medieval system of knighthood.

King Arthur and the knights of the round table are an example of chivalry.

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A group of knights or gallant gentlemen.
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A group of knights or gallant gentlemen.
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Courtesy, respect and honorable conduct between opponents in wartime.
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The demonstration of any of the knightly qualities.
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The medieval system of knighthood.
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Origin of chivalry

  • Middle English chivalrie from Old French chevalerie from chevalier knight chevalier
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Middle English chivalrie, a late 13th century loan from Old French word chevalerie, "knighthood, chivalry, nobility, cavalry" (11th century), the -erie abstract of chevaler "knight, horseman", from Medieval Latin caballarius (“horseman, knight”), a derivation from caballus (“horse”). Medieval Latin caballaria (“knighthood, status or fief of a knight”) dates to the 12th century.
    From Wiktionary