Chivalry Definition

shĭvəl-rē
chivalries
noun
chivalries
The medieval system of knighthood.
Webster's New World
A group of knights or gallant gentlemen.
Webster's New World
The noble qualities a knight was supposed to have, such as courage, honor, and a readiness to help the weak and protect women.
Webster's New World
The demonstration of any of the knightly qualities.
Webster's New World

(now rare, historical) Cavalry; horsemen armed for battle.

Wiktionary
Antonyms:
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Other Word Forms of Chivalry

Noun

Singular:
chivalry
Plural:
chivalries

Origin of Chivalry

  • Middle English chivalrie, a late 13th century loan from Old French word chevalerie, "knighthood, chivalry, nobility, cavalry" (11th century), the -erie abstract of chevaler "knight, horseman", from Medieval Latin caballarius (“horseman, knight”), a derivation from caballus (“horse”). Medieval Latin caballaria (“knighthood, status or fief of a knight”) dates to the 12th century.

    From Wiktionary

  • Middle English chivalrie from Old French chevalerie from chevalier knight chevalier

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

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