Rock-roll meaning

(uncountable) The naturally occurring aggregate of solid mineral matter that constitutes a significant part of the earth's crust.

The face of the cliff is solid rock.

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A mass of stone projecting out of the ground or water.

The ship crashed on the rocks.

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(UK) A boulder or large stone; or (US, Canada) a smaller stone; a pebble.

Some fool has thrown a rock through my window.

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A large hill or island having no vegetation.

Pearl Rock near Cape Cod is so named because the morning sun makes it gleam like a pearl.

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(figuratively) Something that is strong, stable, and dependable; a person who provides security or support to another.
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(geology) Any natural material with a distinctive composition of minerals.
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(slang) A precious stone or gem, especially a diamond.

Look at the size of that rock on her finger!

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A lump or cube of ice.

I'll have a whisky on the rocks, please.

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(UK, uncountable) A type of confectionery made from sugar in the shape of a stick, traditionally having some text running through its length.

While we're in Brighton, let's get a stick of rock!

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(US, slang) A crystallized lump of crack cocaine.
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(US, slang) An unintelligent person, especially one who repeats mistakes.
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(South Africa, slang, derogatory) An Afrikaner.
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(US poker slang) An extremely conservative player who is willing to play only the very strongest hands.
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(basketball, informal) A basketball (ball).
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A fish, the striped bass.
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A fish, the huss or rock salmon.

We ordered rock and chips to take away.

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(intransitive) To move gently back and forth.

Rock the baby to sleep.

The empty swing rocked back and forth in the wind.

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To cause to shake or sway violently.

Don't rock the boat.

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(intransitive) To sway or tilt violently back and forth.

The boat rocked at anchor.

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(intransitive, of ore etc.) To be washed and panned in a cradle or in a rocker.

The ores had been rocked and laid out for inspection.

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To disturb the emotional equilibrium of; to distress; to greatly impact (most often positively).

Downing Street has been rocked by yet another sex scandal.

She rocked my world.'

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(intransitive)
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An act of rocking.
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A style of music characterized by basic drum-beat, generally 4/4 riffs, based on (usually electric) guitar, bass guitar, drums, and vocals.
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(intransitive) To play, perform, or enjoy rock music, especially with a lot of skill or energy.

Let’s rock!

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(intransitive, slang) To be very favourable or skilful; to excel.

Chocolate rocks.

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To thrill or excite, especially with rock music.

Let's rock this joint!

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To do something with excitement yet skillfully.

I need to rock a piss.

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To wear (a piece of clothing, outfit etc.) successfully or with style; to carry off (a particular look, style).
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(countable) Distaff.

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(uncountable) The flax or wool on a distaff.
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Archaic form of roc (mythical bird)
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Origin of rock-roll

  • From Middle English rocke, rokke (“rock formation”), from Old English *rocc (“rock”), as in Old English stānrocc (“high stone rock, peak, obelisk”), and also later from Anglo-Norman, Old Northern French roc, roce, roque (compare Modern French roche, from Old French), from Medieval Latin rocca (attested 767), from Vulgar Latin *rocca, of uncertain origin, sometimes said to be of Celtic (Gaulish) origin (compare Breton roch).

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English rokken, from Old English roccian, from Proto-Germanic *rukkōną (compare obsolete Dutch (Holland) rokken, Middle High German rocken ‘to drag, jerk’, Icelandic rukka ‘to yank’), from *rugnōną, from Proto-Indo-European *h₃ruk-néh₂-, from *h₃runk- (compare Latin runcāre (“to weed”), Latvian rũķēt (“to toss, dig”)).

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English rok, rocke , rokke, perhaps from Middle Dutch rocke (whence Dutch rok), Middle Low German rocken, or Old Norse rokkr (whence Icelandic / Faroese rokkur, Danish rok, Swedish spinnrock (“spinning wheel”)). Cognate with Old High German rocko (“distaff”).

    From Wiktionary

  • Shortened from rock and roll. Since the meaning of rock has adapted to mean a simpler, more modern, metal-like genre, rock and roll has generally been left referring to earlier forms such as that of the 1950s, notably more swing-oriented style.

    From Wiktionary